Chuck Wagon Rice with Pork Belly Sausage

Chuck Wagon Rice

http://shop.cheflippe.com/pork-belly-sausage/

Ingredients:

2 Lbs.               Pork Belly Sausage

1/2 cup             Rice

12 oz                Peeled and diced tomatoes

1                      Onion finely chopped

2 cloves            Elephant garlic

½ tsp.               Ground Black pepper

4                      Laurel leaves whole

1 tsp                 Sea Salt

Pan sear sausages in large cast iron pan. Remove from pan and cut sausages into ¼” slices. Add a drizzle of olive oil, chopped onion, garlic and sausage. Stir while cooking for 1 minute.

Add rice, salt, pepper and tomatoes. Stir one more time. Add water to ½” above rice level. Stir in Laurel leaves cover and simmer until done.

Optional: 1 tsp. cumin

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5 Comments

Filed under Food, pork belly sausage, recipes

5 responses to “Chuck Wagon Rice with Pork Belly Sausage

  1. What is the difference of elephant garlic and normal garlic besides the size? Great recipe BTWs!

    • From Chef Lippe.

      Elephant garlic belongs to the leek family, so botanically is a bit different than ‘regular’ garlic. Other than that none I know of.

      Wikipedia says:
      Elephant garlic (Allium ampeloprasum var. ampeloprasum) is a plant belonging to the onion genus. It is not a true garlic, but actually a variant of the species to which the garden leek belongs. It has a tall, solid, flowering stalk and broad, flat leaves much like those of the leek, but forms a bulb consisting of very large, garlic-like cloves. The flavor of these, while not exactly like garlic, is much more similar to garlic than to leeks. The flavor is milder than garlic, and much more palatable to some people than garlic when used raw as in salads.

    • Elephant garlic is not properly a garlic. It belongs to the leek family, its level of allicin is lower thus it does not have a “garlicky” smell. It is great for stir frying and other applications where you want garlic to “show” without overpowering other flavors

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