Category Archives: Amish Cheese

Gourmet 4 cheese Mac and Cheese with Serrano Ham

Macaroni-and-Cheese-with-serrano

Total Time 1 hour and 15 minutes (Cook time 50 minutes) Serves 6

Ingredients

6 tablespoons butter

1/2 cup flour

4 cups milk, warm

1 teaspoon dry mustard

¼ teaspoon nutmeg

¼ teaspoon cayenne pepper or hot sauce to taste

Salt to taste

Dash Worcestershire Sauce

8 oz shredded Amish cheddar

8 oz shredded Asiago

4 oz shredded BellaVitano Balsamic

1 pound macaroni of your choice, cooked al dente

1 stack crumbled butter cracker (Ritz like)

2 oz shaved Serrano ham lightly fried and crumbled

2 oz Parmigiano Reggiano crumbled for topping

Directions

Heat oven to 350 degrees F.

Melt butter in large sauce pan over medium heat.  Add flour and cook, stirring for 1 minute. Whisk in the warm milk and bring to a boil, continue to whisk constantly. The mixture will thicken as the heat increases. Continue to whisk while adding the dry mustard, nutmeg, cayenne, salt and Worcestershire. Stir in the cheddar, Asiago, Bellavitano and stir until it is melted.

Pour cheese sauce over noodles and add to a 3 quart casserole dish.

Sprinkle top with cracker crumbs, Serrano crumbs and Parmigiano crumbles. Bake for 35 minutes.

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Filed under Amish Cheese, Artisan Cheese, Asiago, Balsamic Cheddar, Cheese, Macaroni and cheese, Parmigiano Reggiano, Serrano Ham

Goat Cheese Souffle with Honeyed Apricots

goat cheese souffle

Misty Lovely Goat Cheese

Misty Lovely is an Amish raw milk goat cheese made in Leola, PA by Amos Miller at his Misty Creek Dairy.  The Amish make their cheese with recipes that have been handed down for generations. Misty Lovely is an exception.  Amos Miller has established himself as the “go-to” goat ricotta producer with this velvety invention.

The story goes like this… Once upon a time, in a little tiny village close to Lancaster Pennsylvania cheese maker Amos set out to make a feta goat cheese.  He had a nice farm, and the goats were fed the Pennsylvania grasses and clovers and were cared for like members of the family.  The goats even got to watch the children play at the village school which is next door at lunch time.  They were happy goats.  And yes happy goats make better milk!  Back to the story…. Amos set out to make a feta goat cheese. He took the raw goat milk added vegetable rennet, Celtic sea salt, lots of love and a few secret ingredients and worked his magic.  He watched over his new cheese for 60 days and at the right time he sampled his product and was surprise with the feta.  His cheese did not taste like a feta.  It started out like a feta in your mouth but finished like cheddar.  What to do now?  It’s not a feta nor was it a cheddar but it had a wonderful flavor more like a ricotta salata.  They took the cheese into town and asked Bill, at the Clock Tower Cheese Shoppe in Gap, PA to try it.  Bill sniffed it, pulled the curds apart and tasted it. He did a happy dance and declared it “lovely” and a cheese was named.

Raw milk cheeses are aged for 60 days which allows for a natural pasteurization and allows the cheese maker to retain a lot of the flavors of the raw milk.  More and more Amish families are turning to cheese making to preserve their way of living.  These cheeses are Artisan/Artisanal cheese that are produced primarily by hand, in small batches with lots of attention paid to the tradition of cheese making.  This cheese is also classified as “farmstead” by the American Cheese Society.  This means that it is made with milk from the farmer’s own herd or flock, on the farm where the animals are raised.  More and more people want to know their farmers and where their food is coming from.  Americans are learning that there is so much more to cheese than Kraft and cheddar.  It is reported that an average American will consume 10 pounds of cheddar a year.   One of the other things you will notice is that an Artisanal cheese’s flavor will change over the year.  In the spring it tends to be creamier and richer while in the winter months while the animals are eating hay it becomes more dense and piquant.

But once you taste really good cheese it’s hard to go back to the other cheeses that they grew up with.  This is one of those cheeses. It becomes addictive and the more you eat the more you want!

To start off any cheese souffle, you need a bechamel sauce.  You may be familiar with this sauce from making it for other dishes – mac and cheese or lasagna.  It’s a basic white sauce that’s a staple of French cooking, made from a roux of butter and flour cooked in milk.  You’ll also probably be pretty familiar with how to make it if you’ve ever made your own gravy.

But before we get started, a few tips:

1) Separate your eggs first, right out of the fridge, then let them sit at room temperature while you prepare the rest of the ingredients

2) Pre-measure and lay out everything beforehand.  You don’t want to be running to the fridge for the cheese while your bechamel is burning on the stove.

3) Put your oven rack as low to the floor of the oven as possible.  It helps lift the souffle without the burning of the top.

4)  Be sure the bowl and whisk you’ll be using to beat your egg whites are metal, completely clean and dry.  The smallest trace of oil will prevent the egg whites from whisking properly.

5) Be sure to visit Florida Cheese Club to order your Misty Lovely Goat Cheese.

Honeyed Apricots
2 Tablespoons granulated sugar
1 Tablespoon honey
2 Tablespoons water
pinch of cinnamon
1/4 cup cognac
1/2 tsp. vanilla extract
1/2 cup dried apricots, halved
juice of half a lemon

Goat Cheese Souffle
2 Tablespoons butter (+1 Tablespoon to grease your ramekin)
1 Tablespoon sugar
2 teaspoons flour
pinch of nutmeg
1/2 cup milk
2 oz. crumbled Misty Lovely goat cheese
2 eggs, separated
1/8 teaspoon cream of tartar

To make the honeyed apricots:

Bring sugar, honey, water, cinnamon, cognac and vanilla extract to simmer in a small saucepan over medium heat until syrupy, about 5 minutes.  Add the apricots and cook 3 minutes more, then add the lemon juice.  Let cool while you make your souffle.

To make the souffle:

Preheat oven to 350°F.   Brush a 16 oz. ramekin with softened butter.  Coat with sugar.

Warm the milk in a small saucepan over low heat.  Meanwhile, melt your butter in a medium saucepan over medium-low heat.  When the foam starts to subside, add your flour and nutmeg, whisking constantly for 2-3 minutes.  This is your roux.  You don’t want it to brown, you just want to cook out the starchy taste of the flour, so do not be tempted to raise the heat.  Add your warm milk and continue whisking over low heat until the mixture thickens (if your whisk leaves a noticeable “trail” in the sauce, it’s done).  Remove from heat.

Add your goat cheese and whisk until melted.  Add the egg yolks one at a time, and continue whisking until smooth.  Transfer to a bowl and refrigerate while you whisk your egg whites.

Beat your egg whites and cream of tartar with a stand or hand mixer with a whisk attachment until stiff peaks form.  They should be glossy and smooth, and stand up straight when you pull the whisk out.

Add 1/3 of the egg whites to the cooled bechamel mixture and gently fold in until incorporated.  Repeat with the remaining egg whites.  Pour the mixture into the ramekin, leaving about 1 inch of space from the top.  Run a clean finger around the edge of the ramekin, leaving a sort of “well” so the souffle will rise straighter.

Place on a baking sheet and into the oven for about 20 minutes (keep an eye on them – times can vary).

This is a great, lightly sweet dish that can be eaten as an appetizer or dessert, or even a brunch-time meal.

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Filed under Amish Cheese, Artisan Cheese, goat cheese, Misty Lovely

Mother’s Day May 11, 2014

 

cheese hamper

ORDER TODAY CALL 321-338-0628 or 321-345-4568 or visit

FLORIDACHEESECLUB.COM

Pick up a bottle of your mom’s favorite wine and we will pair it with two cheeses and a bowl of olives for a great picnic.

Package includes:

1)      Wicker Hamper

2)      2 selections of cheese (total weight ½ pound) paired to your bottle of wine

3)      1 Container of olives of your choice

Price for this package is $79

Add a salami or Serrano Ham for a little more

The modern holiday of Mother’s Day was first celebrated in 1908, when Anna Jarvis held a memorial for her mother in Grafton, West Virginia. She then began a campaign to make “Mother’s Day” a recognized holiday in the United States. Although she was successful in 1914, she was already disappointed with its commercialization by the 1920s. Jarvis’ holiday was adopted by other countries and it is now celebrated all over the world. In this tradition, each person offers a gift, card, or remembrance toward their mothers, grandmothers, and/ or maternal figure on mother’s day.

Various observances honoring mothers existed in America during the 1870s and the 1880s, but these never had resonance beyond the local level.

 

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Filed under Amish Cheese, Artisan Cheese, Cheese, Chef Lippe

Misty Lovely an Amish Goat Cheese

misty lovely 1

Misty Lovely is an Amish raw milk goat cheese made in Leola, PA by Amos Miller at his Misty Creek Dairy.  The Amish make their cheese with recipes that have been handed down for generations. Misty Lovely is an exception.  Amos Miller has established himself as the “go-to” goat ricotta producer with this velvety invention.

The story goes like this… Once upon a time, in a little tiny village close to Lancaster Pennsylvania cheese maker Amos set out to make a feta goat cheese.  He had a nice farm, and the goats were fed the Pennsylvania grasses and clovers and were cared for like members of the family.  The goats even got to watch the children play at the village school which is next door at lunch time.  They were happy goats.  And yes happy goats make better milk!  Back to the story…. Amos set out to make a feta goat cheese. He took the raw goat milk added vegetable rennet, Celtic sea salt, lots of love and a few secret ingredients and worked his magic.  He watched over his new cheese for 60 days and at the right time he sampled his product and was surprise with the feta.  His cheese did not taste like a feta.  It started out like a feta in your mouth but finished like cheddar.  What to do now?  It’s not a feta nor was it a cheddar but it had a wonderful flavor more like a ricotta salata.  They took the cheese into town and asked Bill, at the Clock Tower Cheese Shoppe in Gap, PA to try it.  Bill sniffed it, pulled the curds apart and tasted it. He did a happy dance and declared it “lovely” and a cheese was named.

Raw milk cheeses are aged for 60 days which allows for a natural pasteurization and allows the cheese maker to retain a lot of the flavors of the raw milk.  More and more Amish families are turning to cheese making to preserve their way of living.  These cheeses are Artisan/Artisanal cheese that are produced primarily by hand, in small batches with lots of attention paid to the tradition of cheese making.  This cheese is also classified as “farmstead” by the American Cheese Society.  This means that it is made with milk from the farmer’s own herd or flock, on the farm where the animals are raised.  More and more people want to know their farmers and where their food is coming from.  Americans are learning that there is so much more to cheese than Kraft and cheddar.  It is reported that an average American will consume 10 pounds of cheddar a year.   One of the other things you will notice is that an Artisanal cheese’s flavor will change over the year.  In the spring it tends to be creamier and richer while in the winter months while the animals are eating hay it becomes more dense and piquant.

But once you taste really good cheese it’s hard to go back to the other cheeses that they grew up with.  This is one of those cheeses. It becomes addictive and the more you eat the more you want!

Try Stuffing dates with shredded Misty Lovely goat cheese, some cream cheeses and almonds.

dates stuffed with goat cheese

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Filed under Amish Cheese, Artisan Cheese, Cheese, Chef Lippe, Misty Lovely

Bouche Amish Farmhouse Cheddar

amish1

 

 

 

 

 

FARMHOUSE CHEDDAR FROM THE AMISH

Cheddar is one of the most popular cheeses. The mere mention of the name can bring many cheese lovers to salivate. So cheddar is cheddar, right? Definitely not! Cheddar is made in just about every English-speaking country and just as different countries have different accents, so they make different cheddar.  The Amish treat their cows as part of the family. The Amish use only their own milk to make their cheeses. They are passionate about the quality of their products.

TASTING NOTES

The aroma of authentic cheddar should be nutty or grassy, with a rich texture and complex flavors ranging from fruity to a woody oakiness. Factory processed cheddar is usually rubbery and dense and without the few cracks you will find in your Bouche farmhouse cheddar which can range in color from straw yellow to beige with a red bloomy rind from the cherry wood it is aged in.

WHAT’S IN A NAME?

There are two theories on how Cheddar got its name. The first is that it is named after the English town Cheddar in southwestern England, where the cheese was first made. The other theory is that the name derives from one of the steps in the cheese-making process. After the cow’s milk curd is scalded twice, it is “cheddared” by repeatedly being cut up to remove whey and breaking the curd until it is smooth and silky. We love English Cheddar for its buttery, nutty richness, without the slightest hint of bitterness or bite, but we are addicted to the Amish Cheddar. This richness and creaminess can in part be attributed to the cow’s milk from which Amish Cheddar is made. This breed is renowned for having the perfect fat-to-protein ratio, which results in a fantastically, full-flavored cheddar. The flavor of Cheddar is often described as “sharp,” which is a direct relation to the acidity level. The higher it is, the sharper the cheese tastes. It is very easy to put this “sharpness” into cheese, and it actually kills other flavors. So what most farmhouse cheddar makers strive for is a breadth of flavors that develop with time. You’ll know great cheddar if you can still taste the sweet nuttiness several minutes after you have finished your first mouthful. Cheddar can be paired wonderfully with dark beer.

Please visit our web site for more information on this cheese and others Florida Cheese Club or like us on Facebook for GREAT recipes.

500 milkcans 021

 

The following is from Tom’s Amish Dairy web site:

With the burgeoning interest in health foods, cove or artisan cheese has steadily been receiving the recognition that it deserves. Until recent years, the only cave cheeses on the market were imported from Europe. Now, however, enterprising farmers have traveled to Europe and learned the secrets from master cheese makers.

These Artisan-Style cheeses are made from raw (unpasteurized milk) obtained from animals located on the farm where the cheese is made. The cows are pastured on organic, chemical-free grasses and receive no hormones or antibiotics, only homeopathic remedies, if necessary. Raw milk can be safely used in the cheese making process. The FDA requires that all raw milk cheese produced and sold in the United States be aged for a minimum of 60 days, the time deemed necessary to destroy any or most harmful bacteria.

Cheese made from raw milk or whole milk is superior in taste to those made from pasteurized milk. Most pasteurized milk is from a collection of dairies and is generally tainted with chemicals. The heating process used to pasteurize milk destroys many natural enzymes in the milk that affects the cheese making process. Pasteurization also results in the loss of many delicate flavors and retards the ripening of the cheese.

Artisan cheeses are handcrafted and a work of art in the world of cheese- making. The milk is chilled and transferred directly into the cheese vat and heated. The original culture from France (kept from batch to batch) is added once the milk reaches the correct temperature. Soon vegetable rennet is added and the cheese making process begins.

Smethe: Cheese is not pressed but allowed to drain naturally to retain the natural enzymes. The wheels of cheese are rubbed with Celtic Sea Salt and placed in a cave where the temperature of approximately 58 degrees is maintained in a humid atmosphere. Humidity, air circulation and temperature are the three factors that control the maturation of cheese.

The process of aging and maturing the cheese is called Affinage, a name givenby the French. In addition to flavor, many healthful compounds may be developed during affinage. During this manually intensive process, wheels are brushed with Celtic Sea Salt, water or other liquids and turned every two or three days. Molds are encouraged to grow to produce specific rinds, blue veins, etc. The mold’s job is to protect the fresh curd. The rind of the mold extends the life of the curd by acting as a barrier to contaminants and by holding the moisture.

There are two categories of mold-ripened cheese – Natural Rind and White – Mold. Natural Rind cheeses are acquired naturally without a lot of help from the Affineur (the one who carries out the work of Affinage). White – Mold cheeses have their rind grown using a strain of culture. They are often created in laboratories to produce a certain affect and purchased by the cheesemaker.

The mold on natural rind cheeses may be various colors. Whatever the color of the mold, it represents a natural process and is quite edible. Only a bright yellow color should be avoided. Eating the rind is a matter of personal preference. The rind will definitely make the cheese stronger in flavor, but the choice if eating or not is up to the individual.

Artisan cheese should never be stored in plastic as it kills the healthful enzymes. To store, wrap cheese in was paper and then in aluminum foil. Place in the vegetable bin of the refrigerator. Freezing this particular style of cheese results in loss of quality. Bring cheese to room temperature before serving for the best flavor.

Americans   are now learning what Europeans have known for centuries and the Artisan Cheese Cart is replacing the dessert cart in many upscale restaurants in major cities. Most restaurants retain the services of a wine and cheese expert or Fromager. Some places even have their own well stocked cheese caves on the premises to provide their customers with the best in Artisan Cheese. The time and labor required to produce these cheeses is reflected in the price but that has not deferred the many that are enjoying the taste and healthful benefits of Cave-Aged Artisan Cheese.

BOUCHE’ –   Bouche’  is an approximately two (2) year old Cheddar that is aged in forty (40) lb. blocks at 50 degrees. We then cut up the block into four(4) and put it in the cave with the Smethe. It is then treated and handled the same as the Smethe. It ages for approximately ten (10) weeks or until the White Mold has completely engulfed the block of cheese. It is then ready for sale.

BOUCHE’ French Renaissance word meaning “square with a knife” This is a Cheddar type cheese.

SMETHE French Renaissance word meaning “smooth”. This is a camembert (KAM uhm behr) type cheese.  It has a subtle salty taste with fruity overtones.

 

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Manteche Provolone Chicken and Broccoli Casserole

By Chef Lippe

chicken cassarole

Serves 6

Ingredients

  •          6 ounces fresh lemon linguini – cut into 3” pieces
  •          3 tablespoons of butter from the Manteche
  •          1 sweet onion, chopped
  •          ¼ cup all purpose flour
  •          1 ½ cups chicken broth
  •          ¾ cup milk
  •          Salt and pepper to taste
  •          5 cups cooked, shredded chicken
  •          2 bunches of fresh broccoli heads
  •          1 cup shredded Bouche Cheddar
  •           1 cup shredded Manteche provolone

Directions

  1.       Bring a large pot of lightly salted water to a boil. Add pasta and cook pre directions (about 3 minutes or until al dente); drain. Preheat oven to 400 degrees F  Grease a 9×13 inch casserole dish.
  2.       Melt butter in a large saucepan over medium heat. Saute onion until tender, about 3 minutes. Mix in flour. Gradually stir in chicken broth. Slowly stir in milk, and cook, stirring, until sauce begins to thicken.     Season with salt and pepper.
  3.       Place cooked noodles in the bottom of casserole dish. Arrange cooked chicken in an even layer over noodles. Place broccoli over the chicken. Pour sauce evenly over the broccoli. Combine cheeses, and sprinkle half over the casserole.
  4.       Bake in preheated oven for 20 minutes, or until the cheese melts. Remove from oven, and sprinkle with remaining cheese. Allow to set for 5 minutes, until cheese melts.

 

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Filed under Amish Cheese, Artisan pasta, Chef Lippe, Manteche Provolone, recipes

OH MY GOD and we mean it Mac and Cheese

MY OH GOD Mac and Cheese

mac_cheese_01

Ingredients

3-1/2 cups large elbow macaroni

10 oz. Velveeta cheese, cut into 1″ squares

10 oz. Bouche Amish cheddar cheese, cut into 1″ squares

15 oz. Gruyere cheese, shredded

1 cup Asiago cheese shredded

1 cup  Bellavitano with Balsamic vinegar shredded

4 oz. cream cheese, at room temp.

1/2 cup sour cream

1 cup heavy cream

1 cup half-and-half

2 eggs

2-2/3 Tbsp. flour

1 Tbsp. Worcestershire sauce

1 tsp. garlic powder

1 tsp. onion powder

1 tsp. dry mustard powder

1/8-1/4 tsp. cayenne pepper

1 tsp. kosher salt

Pinch paprika

1 Tbsp. fresh chives, for garnish

 Cooking Directions

Breathe Deep and Smile your family is going to love you!  You’re about to prepare the best mac and cheese ever!

Grease a 13″ x 9″ nonstick metal baking pan with 1 Tbsp. butter. Preheat oven to 350. Prepare macaroni according to the package directions, but make sure it’s al dente. (It should be firm.) Be sure to add a pinch of salt and a dash of olive oil to the boiling water while cooking. Drain pasta well and pour into the baking pan.

In a large mixing bowl, add the heavy cream, half-and-half, and sour cream; break the cream cheese into little bits with your fingers as you add it to the bowl. Add the egg, flour, Worcestershire sauce, garlic and onion powders, dry mustard, cayenne pepper; combine very well with a mixer to break up that cream cheese. It will look lumpy, but that’s okay.

Starting at the corners of the pasta dish, place and push down the Velveeta and the Bouche cheddar cubes. Work your way around and toward the middle (they won’t push down completely, but just smooch them down a bit).

Now sprinkle the Gruyere cheese evenly over the top. Gently and evenly pour that non-fat, low calorie artery-clogging (grin from ear to ear) mixture on it, covering all areas. Gently shake the pan afterwards for a sec to make sure the liquid is even in the pan.  Make little holes into areas of the mixture with your fingers. (You’re just getting some of that Gruyere down deeper below the surface.)

Sprinkle the Asiago and Bellavitano combo over the mixture and sprinkle the paprika on top. Put this piece of heaven in the oven (make sure your oven rack is right in the middle) and bake until brown and bubbly — approximately 30 minutes.

It will be creamy in the center and crustier on the top and edges. Chop some fresh chives and get those taste buds ready. When it’s done, garnish with the chives. Try not to eat part of the crusty top before you serve it, I know it’s hard so Breathe deep and try hard.

This is your ticket to a happy family.

To change it up a little sprinkle 3 oz. of finely chopped Serrano Ham on the very top just after the Asiago and Bellavitano. 

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Filed under Amish Cheese, Artisan Cheese, Asiago, Chef Lippe, Macaroni and cheese, Serrano Ham