Category Archives: figs

Danish Blue Cheese, figs and Serrano Ham!

blue cheese fig and serrano

Danish Blue (also known as Danablu) is a strong, blue veined cheese. This semi-soft creamery cheese is typically drum or block shaped and has a white to yellowish, slightly moist, edible rind. Made from cow’s milk, it has a fat content of 25–30% (50–60% in dry matter) and is aged for eight to twelve weeks.

Before ageing, copper wires or rods are used to pierce the formed  curds to distribute the mold (Penicillium roqueforti) evenly through the cheese. The holes can still be seen when the finished wheel is cut open.

Danish Blue was invented early in the 20th century by a Danish cheese maker named Marius Boel with the intention of emulating a Roquefort style cheese. Danish Blue has a milder flavor characterized by a sharp, salty taste.

Danish Blue is often served crumbled on salads or as a dessert cheese with fruit. In Denmark, it is often served on bread or biscuits.

Danish Blue and Esrom are the only two Danish cheeses that are PGI marked by the EU, meaning that they may only be produced in Denmark from Danish milk and at approved dairies that produce the cheeses according to the specifications laid down.

Wine to Pair with Danish Blue

Cabernet Sauvignon, often referred to as the “King of Red Wine Grapes,” originally from Bordeaux, with a substantial foothold in California’s wine races, has the privilege of being the world’s most sought after red wine. Cabernet Sauvignon grapes tend to favor warmer climates and are often an ideal wine for aging, with 5-10 years being optimal for the maturation process to peak. Because Cabs take a bit longer to reach maturation, allowing their flavors to mellow, they are ideal candidates for blending with other grapes, primarily Merlot. This blending softens the Cabernet, adding appealing fruit tones, without sacrificing its innate character.

Cheese Type: Blue

Milk Type: cow

Rennet: vegetarian-friendly

Age: 8+ weeks

Origin: Denmark

bleu-cheese-stuffed-figs-recipe

Baked figs with Danish blue cheese & Serrano Ham

Slice the figs in half, make a small indent with the back of a teaspoon then place a small amount of blue cheese (marble size) and top with a piece of prosciutto. Arrange on a baking tray and roast in a hot oven, about 425F for 8-10 minutes, but keep an eye on them! You want the Serrano to be browning and the cheese and fig to melt together nicely, you don’t want them to over bake so they end up a jammy mess on the bottom of the tray. Let them cool down slightly so your guests don’t burn their mouths and then watch them disappear in an instant.

 

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Filed under Artisan Cheese, Blue Cheese, Danish Blue Cheese, figs, Serrano Ham

Drunken Goat

drunken goat 2

Drunken Goat is a most unusual goat cheese.  So you ask, “What’s with the name?” Perhaps you have images of goats weaving about the pasture, teetering, perhaps sparring, and maybe snoozing on their backs with hooves in the air pointing to azure blue skies. But just to clear the air, neither wine, nor any other form of spirit is fed to the goats. The name is a figurative one, referring to the manner in which this goat cheese soaks up the sumptuous red wine in which it’s bathed. Drunken Goat comes from the Murcia region of Spain, which is famous for its Doble Pasta wine as well as its excellent goat’s milk. The milk used to make this cheese comes exclusively from Murciana goats. It is high in both fat and protein, giving this cheese its amazing creaminess. Drunken Goat is aged for a short period of time before being immersed in the Doble Pasta wine for 72 hours or so. The result not only adds flavor to the cheese, it also imparts an incredibly stunning violet color to the rind. Usually rinds are various shades of brown or cream, sometimes with moldy patches of blue. It is definitely unique for a cheese to have such a brilliantly colored, violet rind. Some have likened the hue to the fiery sunsets seen in the region where it is made. After the cheese has had its luxury Doble Pasta bath, it’s then aged for an additional 75 days to allow full maturation and intermingling of the cheese and wine flavors.

TASTING NOTES

The Doble Pasta wine, which once bathed your Drunken Goat, is a young wine with pronounced flavors. It gives the cheese both its color and its flavor. You can expect to smell the aroma and taste the wine in the finish of the cheese. The flavor begins mild and oh-so-creamy, but finishes with a wonderful tangy sweetness and a fruity, luscious, grapey aroma. Serve it with desserts or as an appetizer.  Pairs with medium fruity red wine, chorizo, almonds and olives. Try using this cheese in your next grilled cheese with a little tapenade.

Cheese Type: Semi-soft

Milk Type: Goat

Rennet: animal

Age: 75 days

Origin: Spain

Region: Murcia

drunken goat crostini

Fig and Drunken Goat Crostini:

By Jamie Oliver

  • 1/2 baguette, sliced at a diagonal, 1/2″thick
  • olive oil
  • 1 pint of figs, washed and stemmed
  • 3 Tablespoons creme fraiche
  • 1 egg yolk
  • 1/2 teaspoon dry mustard powder
  • 3/4 cup shredded drunken goat cheese (or manchego, or campo)
  • salt and pepper
  • drizzle of vegetarian worcestershire sauce, or balsamic vinegar
  • finely chopped rosemary, or thyme

Directions:

  • preheat the broiler. drizzle a bit of olive oil and a sprinkle of salt on the sliced bread, and toast under the broiler very slightly on both sides. cover a baking sheet with foil, and place or arrange the toasts on it.
  • thinly slice up all the pretty figs – each toast will use 3-4 slices. quarter the rest of the figs and scoop out their guts. spread these on the toast.
  • mix together the creme fraiche, egg, mustard, and shredded cheese. season with salt and pepper. spread this mixture on the toast, covering it completely to the edges. broil the toasts until the cheese is bubbly and dark golden. remove the toasts from the broiler and let cool slightly. top each toast with a few sliced figs and a pinch of rosemary.

there’s enough cheese sauce in this recipe for at least a dozen small toasts. depending on how stingy you are with it, you could get up to 20.

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Filed under Artisan Cheese, Chef Lippe, Drunken Goat, Drunken Goat Crostini, figs, goat cheese

Day 2 of our Blue Cheese Weekend Specials – Danish Blue

Danish Blue Cheese

By Chef Lippe

Danish_Blue_cheese

Danish Blue (also known as Danablu) is a strong, blue veined cheese. This semi-soft creamery cheese is typically drum or block shaped and has a white to yellowish, slightly moist, edible rind. Made from cow’s milk, it has a fat content of 25–30% (50–60% in dry matter) and is aged for eight to twelve weeks.

Before ageing, copper wires or rods are used to pierce the formed  curds to distribute the mold (Penicillium roqueforti) evenly through the cheese. The holes can still be seen when the finished wheel is cut open.

Danish Blue was invented early in the 20th century by a Danish cheese maker named Marius Boel with the intention of emulating a Roquefort style cheese. Danish Blue has a milder flavor characterized by a sharp, salty taste.

Danish Blue is often served crumbled on salads or as a dessert cheese with fruit. In Denmark, it is often served on bread or biscuits.

Danish Blue and Esrom are the only two Danish cheeses that are PGI marked by the EU, meaning that they may only be produced in Denmark from Danish milk and at approved dairies that produce the cheeses according to the specifications laid down.

Wine to Pair with Danish Blue

Cabernet Sauvignon, often referred to as the “King of Red Wine Grapes,” originally from Bordeaux, with a substantial foothold in California’s wine races, has the privilege of being the world’s most sought after red wine. Cabernet Sauvignon grapes tend to favor warmer climates and are often an ideal wine for aging, with 5-10 years being optimal for the maturation process to peak. Because Cabs take a bit longer to reach maturation, allowing their flavors to mellow, they are ideal candidates for blending with other grapes, primarily Merlot. This blending softens the Cabernet, adding appealing fruit tones, without sacrificing its innate character.

Baked figs with Danish blue cheese & Prosciutto

Black or green figs Danish blue cheese with Serrano ham.

blue cheese fig and serrano

Slice the figs in half, make a small indent with the back of a teaspoon then place a small amount of blue cheese (marble size) and top with a piece of prosciutto. Arrange on a baking tray and roast in a hot oven, about 425F/200C for 8-10 minutes, but keep an eye on them! You want the prosciutto to be browning and the cheese and fig to melt together nicely, you don’t want them to over bake so they end up a jammy mess on the bottom of the tray (we’ve both been there – still delicious though!). Let them cool down slightly so your guests don’t burn their mouths and then watch them disappear in an instant.

Remember to wear blue to market for your discount!

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Filed under Blue Cheese, Chef Lippe, Danish Blue Cheese, figs, Serrano Ham

Serrano Ham Tapas – A FEAST for your eyes and your tummy!

By Chef Lippe

Serrano ham at market

Serrano ham is one of Spain’s favorite meats. When you walk into any tapas bar, restaurant or little shop you will see the hams hanging from the wall or a wall decorated with the ropes from the ham. I have included the recipe for one tapa and pictures from many others. It has also become a favorite at my Farmers Market stands.

I hope you have fun making and eating these!

Chef Lippe

stuffed-endives

Ham and Chicken Stuffed Endives

Left over chicken

Serrano Ham

Alioli

Salt and Pepper to taste

Directions

Slice the bottom inch away from the endive, remove the 6 largest leaves and arrange on plate.

Spoon 1 teaspoon of alioli along the bottom of each leaf.

Arrange shredded chicken on alioli and top with Serrano ham

Drizzle with good olive oil and server with tomatoes and fresh bread.

Enjoy the rest of my many uses of Serrano Ham or better yet come and visit our market stand and try a taste!

Asapargus-Wrapped

fig-with-chevre-and-serrano-hamGrissini-with-Serrano-hamfruit_serrano_ham_tapa_gastronomyham flowersladybug-appetizer-480x360Mini_Mozzarella_Prosciutto_Skewersmonkfish-serrano-ham-kebabsPicture 649serrano and mellonserrano olive and mellonWatermelon_Manchego_and_Serrano_Ham

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Filed under Artisan Cheese, asparagus, Avocados, Bread, Cheese, Cheese Crisps, Chef Lippe, figs, Food, Food blog, fruit, Manchego, Membrillo, olive oil, peach, pineapple, Quince Paste, recipes, Serrano Ham, spices, Tapa, tomatoes

Lamb Burgers stuffed with fig goat cheese

Lamb Burgers stuffed with fig goat cheese

By Chef Lippe

This time of the year is my favorite! I grill all year long but summer BBQ time is so nice to have a quick easy dish that tastes good and is little work. My Lamb burgers are made with ground lamb shoulder and stuffed with a sweet fig goat cheese.

Lamb Burger Ingredients:

1 ½ pound ground lamb shoulder

½ cup minced Italian parsley

1 Tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice

4 cloves of garlic finely chopped

2 Tablespoons Worcestershire sauce

1 Tablespoon salt

½ teaspoon white pepper

 

Fig Goat Cheese Ingredients:

¼ cup honey

½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

12 Fresh figs

¼ cup soft fresh goat cheese

Directions:

 

Mix lamb, parsley, lemon, garlic, Worcestershire sauce, salt and pepper together in a bowl. Form into 4” balls and make a thumb print in centers for cheese filling. Set aside and make cheese.

 

Goat Cheese.  Combine honey and pepper, stir to blend. Chop fresh figs into small pieces and mix with goat cheese and honey pepper mixture. Drop by spoon into thumb prints of lamb burger balls. Clover with lamb and flatten each ball into burger.

 

Grill and eat!

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Filed under Chef Lippe, figs, goat cheese, Lamb burger, recipes