Category Archives: health through eating

Did you know… Broccoli

By Chef Lippe

  • The word broccoli comes from the Latin word brachium and the Italian word braccio, which means “arm”.
  • Broccoli is a part of the cabbage family.
  • Eating broccoli reduces the risk of coronary heart disease and death in postmenopausal women.
  • A compound found in broccoli appears to have more effect than modern antibiotics against the creation of peptic ulcer causing bacteria.
  • Broccoli is a cool-weather crop and grows poorly in the summer.
  • Broccoli is high in Vitamin C and also soluble fiber. A cup of broccoli contains twice the minimum daily requirement of Vitamin C. Imagine that! The Vitamin C in broccoli promotes healthy skin and helps combat cold and flu symptoms
  • Eating Broccoli Regularly Reduces the Risk of Cancer. Research has shown that eating broccoli regularly can reduce the risk of prostate, colon, breast, bladder and ovarian cancer. Broccoli’s dark green color contributes to its cancer-fighting properties.
  • Broccoli Combats Eye Disease. Broccoli contains a high concentration of lutein, a valuable antioxidant that promotes eye health, prevents cataracts and protects against macular degeneration and other chronic eye diseases.
  • Broccoli Promotes Bone Health. Broccoli is a potent source of calcium, and as such helps promote strong bones and teeth. You can eat as much broccoli as you like and not gain weight because it has only 3 calories from fat per cup, unlike other sources of calcium.
  •  Broccoli Lowers the Risk of Birth Defects. The risk of birth defects can be significantly reduced by including broccoli in a pregnant or nursing woman’s daily diet. Broccoli contains folate, a vitamin B supplement that helps the baby develop strong bones.

Okay now that we have the healthy reasons to eat broccoli here are my favorite recipes.

Broccoli Timbales

broccoli-timbale

“Drinking cup” is the English translation of the French word “timbale”. Traditional dessert timbales are simply brioche pastry cups filled with a fruity mixture. This version of the timbale, a cup-shaped custard with minced vegetables, is a lovely side dish for elegant meals. This recipe allows for about 12 timbales as guests rarely enjoy just one.

1/4 cup butter
1 large brown onion, minced
3 cups cooked broccoli, finely chopped
1 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese, plus Parmesan shavings for garnish
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon pepper
3/4 cups heavy cream
6 large eggs

Melt butter in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add onions and cook, stirring occasionally, until translucent, about 3 – 5 minutes. Add onions to broccoli in a bowl, and stir until combined. Stir in cheese, salt, and pepper.

Preheat oven to 325F (165C). Line 12 cups of a muffin pan with foil cups. Spray cups with nonstick cooking spray. Beat cream and eggs in a large bowl until just blended. Pour egg mixture into broccoli, and stir until combined.

Pour mixture into prepared foil cups. Fill a large baking pan halfway with hot water. Set the muffin pan inside the pan of water and place on lower rack of oven. Bake 35-40 minutes or until knife inserted off-center of timbale comes out clean. Remove from heat and cool for 10 minutes.

Remove timbales from muffin pan and gently peel away foil cups. Place upside down on a serving platter or individual plates and garnish with a shaving of Parmesan. Store covered in the refrigerator for up to 2 days.

Makes about 12 timbales

Note

These timbales can be made 1 day in advance and reheated when ready to serve. After timbales have fully cooled, remove them from pan, keeping timbales in their foil cups. Place timbales on a plate, cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate. When ready to serve, gently peel foil cups away from timbales and place upside down on a baking sheet. Warm timbales in a 350F oven for 10 minutes. Or, place timbales upside down on a plate and microwave until warm. Place timbales upside down on serving plate, garnish, and serve.

Or

Broccoli Pasta

Broccoli SauceIngredients

  • 2 bunches broccoli
  • 1 pound fresh pasta
  • 2 tablespoons salt
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1/4 teaspoon hot pepper flakes
  • 1/2 cup ricotta or Parmesan cheese

Directions

Bring a large pot of water to a boil. Add salt. Meanwhile, separate broccoli florets from the stalks (or peel the broccoli stems and cut into small cubes.) Add the broccoli to the boiling water and cook until tender but still bright green, about 5 minutes. Remove broccoli with slotted spoon.

Add pasta and cook to desired doneness.  Drain reserving 1 cup of the pasta water.

In a small skillet, heat olive oil over medium heat and add garlic and hot pepper flakes. Saute until garlic is fragrant, about 1 minute. Add drained broccoli. Mix in ricotta cheese and pasta, until sauce is creamy. If sauce is too dry, add as much pasta water as desired to get a creamy consistency.

 

 

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Filed under Artisan Cheese, Artisan pasta, Broccoli, Chef Lippe, Food, health through eating, heart health, recipes

Carrot Ginger Sauce

Carrot Ginger Sauce (makes 1 cup)

By Chef Lippe

Prep Time: 15 minutes,

Cook Time: 15 minutes,

Total Time: 30 minutes,

 

Ingredients

  • 1 tablespoon canola oil
  • 2 garlic cloves, peeled and minced
  • 1 tablespoon ginger, peeled and minced
  • 4 medium carrots, peeled and chopped
  • 2 tablespoons miso
  • 1 tablespoon tahini
  • 2 tablespoons water

 

Preparation

  1. Heat oil in a sauté pan over medium heat.
  2. Add garlic and sauté until soft, about 30 seconds.
  3. Add ginger and carrots.
  4. Cover and cook until carrots are soft, about 15 minutes.
  5. Transfer to a food processor and add the miso, tahini and water.
  6. Puree until smooth.
  7. Serve tossed with pasta, soba, udon noodles or rice.

*Stays fresh in the refrigerator for 3-4 days.

 Accompaniments: Soba Noodles, Brown Rice, Pasta

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Filed under Artisan pasta, carrot and ginger sauce, carrot sauce, Chef Lippe, Food, Food blog, Ginger, health through eating, recipes

Balsamic Chocolate Cake otherwise known as Guilt Free Chocolate Cake

By Chef Lippe

One bite of this cake and you will be hooked! The cake is rich and moist and the Balsamic vinegar pairs up nicely with the chocolate. I used grapeseed oil which has almost no flavor of its own, is high in vitamin E, C and Omega 6. It also contains a natural chlorophyll; a lot of people say to me “why is chlorophyll good?” and the answer is that it helps to eliminate body odors. If you know someone who has smelly feet just have them take alfalfa pills from your local vitamin shop and it will help if not totally eliminate the smell. Grapeseed oil also helps to raise the good cholesterol (HDL).

Now ladies if you were paying attention I have just given you 5 reasons to feel guilt free about eating this wonderful chocolate cake! Maybe I should change the name to: Guilt Free Chocolate Cake.

Balsamic Chocolate Cake otherwise known as Guilt Free Chocolate Cake

Ingredients:

2 cups water

2 Tablespoons Balsamic vinegar

½ cup Grapeseed Oil

1 Tablespoon vanilla

3 cups flour

2 cups sugar

2/3 cup unsweetened powdered chocolate

2 teaspoons baking soda

1 teaspoon salt

Directions

Sift dry ingredients together.

Blend wet ingredients.

Slowly blend the wet and dry together

Bake 1 hour at 350 F

Let cool and serve with Strawberry Whipped Cream (below)

Fresh Strawberry Whipped Cream

Ingredients:

1 1/2 cups strawberries, plus more for garnish

1/3 cup sugar

2 Tablespoons balsamic vinegar

1 vanilla bean, split lengthwise and seeds scraped

2 1/4 cups heavy cream, divided

12 ounces high quality, bittersweet chocolate

2 Tablespoons powdered sugar

Place strawberries, sugar, balsamic vinegar, vanilla bean seeds and pod into a small saucepan. Simmer over low heat until the strawberries break down and the mixture becomes thick and syrupy. Remove from heat and set aside to cool completely.

Finely chop the chocolate and place in a medium bowl. In a small saucepan, warm 1 cup of the heavy cream until steam starts rising from it. Pour the warm cream over the chopped chocolate and stir until smooth and shiny. Set aside.

In a medium bowl, whip the remaining 1 1/4 cups heavy cream until soft peaks begin to form. Sprinkle in the powdered sugar and continue beating until medium stiff peaks form. Gently fold in the cooled strawberry syrup.

Top cake with desired amount of strawberry whipped cream.

Spoon the chocolate on the top, gently spread it to the edge of the cake so that some falls down the sides. Top with fresh-cut strawberries. Allow the chocolate to set. Keep refrigerated but allow the cake to come to room temperature before serving.

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Filed under Balsamic Vinegar, Chef Lippe, chocolate, chocolate cake, Food, health through eating, recipes, strawberries

Grapeseed Oil for Heart Healthy Fried Faba Bean Snack

By Chef Lippe

Grapeseed Oil

Grapeseed oil has been a well kept secret of gourmet chefs for a long time. It is light and nutty, yet neutral flavor and has the ability to enhance the flavor of a recipe without overpowering them.  It leaves no greasy aftertaste! Which makes it excellent for marinades and salad dressings. Grapeseed oil has a high smoke point (485 F) making it ideal for hot food preparation such as frying and sautéing without smoking. No more setting of the smoke alarms!

Grapeseed oil is made from the seeds of grapes after the wine is pressed. There is no need for hybrid or genetically engineered crops and it does not require additional usage of farmland or water to produce.

Grapeseed oil is high in vitamin E and is 76% essential fatty acid, linoleic acid (also known as Omega 6), low in saturated fat.  It contains natural chlorophyll and valuable antioxidants known as proanthocyninidins. Studies have shown that these antioxidants can significantly raise HDL cholesterol (good cholesterol) and lower LDL cholesterol (bad cholesterol) and triglycerides and may even lower your risk of cardiovascular disease and impotency!

Grapeseed oil has the ability to slow down and reverse free radical damage and reduce the risk of heart disease and slow down skin aging. It is 50 times more potent than Vitamin E and 20 times more effective than Vitamin C in destroying free radicals that roam the body and damage cells.  Additional studies have shown that grapeseed oil can help protect the body from sun damage, improve vision, improve joint flexibility, improve blood circulation and reduce allergic and asthmatic symptoms by inhibiting the formation of histmines.

It contains NO cholesterol, NO sodium and NO preservatives. It is NOT hydrogenated and contains NO solvents, NO trans-fatty acids or free fatty acids. In other words it is so much better for us than any other type of oil.

Grapeseed oil has long been used to promote health.  Some believed it to be an ingredient in a dish know as pulse, and the Old Testament tells us that the prophet Daniel preferred eating this dish over others in order to stay healthy.  To this day, grapeseed oil is used in many cosmetics and skin care products promoting healthy skin.

Pulses are dishes that include chickpeas, peas, lentils, beans and lupins. Pulses are low fat, high fiber, no cholesterol, low glycemic index, high protein, high nutrient foods.  They are excellent foods for people managing diabetes, heart disease or coeliac disease.

Enjoy and know that you are eating healthy!

Faba Nuts

This traditional crunchy snack is popular throughout Northern Africa and the Middle East. They are simple to prepare and provide a tasty alternative to the salted nuts often served with drinks.

Serves: 6
Preparation: 1 hour
Cooking: 20 – 25 mins
Legume Lead-In: Soak whole or split dried faba beans overnight in three times their volume of water. Beans should be consistent size for even frying. Kabuli chickpeas can also be used as a substitute or combine the two types when done for a tasty medley.

Ingredients

  • Desired quantity of faba beans and / or kabuli chickpeas
  • Grapeseed oil roasted garlic

Seasoning

  • Garlic salt
  • Chicken salt
  • Black pepper
  • Cayenne pepper
  • Chilli powder
  • Cumin and / or coriander

Instructions

  1. Deep fry in very hot grapeseed oil. Caution: Cover pot while faba beans are frying or be prepared to clean your entire kitchen! Some pop like popcorn.
  2. Cooking time varies according to bean size. Try a few first to get the precise cooking time – our testers found 2 minutes was too short and 3 minutes too long for their conditions. The bean should reach consistency of a roasted chestnut.
  3. When cooked, spead on paper towel to absorb excess oil.
  4. Lightly salt or spice as desired.
  5. Once cooled, Faba Nuts will remain crisp in airtight container.

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Filed under cayenne pepper, Chef Lippe, Chile Powder, Faba Bean, Food, Grapeseed Oil, health through eating, heart health, Pepper, recipes, spices

Time to relax!

It’s time to RELAX!!!

By Chef Lippe

This week was a busy week with three days spent at the Fancy Food Show here in Washington, DC. The Convention Center was the host to over 2000 food and food related vendors.  I meet with lots of friends and met even more new friends.  I want to share with you what several of my new friends are doing:

Tonewood

Tonewood is redefining a standard for elegance and quality in maple products. Through collaboration with expert sugar makers, we produce pure maple syrups and other specialties. Our products are single-sourced, unblended, and free of additives.

Few things are as imbedded in North American history as maple production. Native Americans were harvesting maple sap and converting it to sugar long before Europeans arrived on the continent. Unique to the northeastern United States and part of Canada, Maple trees are the world’s only self-sustaining crop. They do not deplete the soil; they do not require chemicals, pesticides, cutting, or harvesting. As a result, maple production is environmentally-friendly, organic, and sustainable.

Maple syrup’s benefits extend beyond its great taste. Maple products contain 20 unique health promoting compounds including disease fighting anti-oxidants, minerals, and phenolic compounds. Loaded with nutrients, including manganese, iron, calcium, zinc, and potassium, maple is being hailed as a super food, capable of preventing and fighting diabetes, cancer, osteoporosis, and Alzheimer’s disease.

Maple products are also fat free and contain fewer calories than other sweetening alternatives, including honey, corn syrup, and refined sugars. Since maple syrup and maple sugar can be used as direct substitutes for these other sweetening methods, a simple adjustment can turn your most decadent recipe into a guiltless indulgence.

Recent studies acknowledge the terroir, or “taste of place,” of maple syrup. Simply, just as wine varies in taste depending on where the grapes were grown, maple products vary in taste depending on where the maple trees are rooted. To produce superior maple syrup requires the ideal climate, growing conditions, topography, and geography.

Our location in Mad River Valley, VT combines rich soil, southern facing slopes, and high elevation with ideal maple climate, allowing us to produce sap of unparalleled quality.  Our artisan sugar makers use refined harvesting and crafting techniques to transform this sap into pure maple syrup with exquisite clarity, color, density, and flavor. Their artisan approach is outlined below:

1. In early spring, warm days and freezing nights mark the brief maple harvesting season.

2. In preparation for the harvesting season, sugar makers drill small holes and insert taps to allow for sap to run out of the trees.

3. As warm weather thaws the trees’ sap reserves, excess sap runs through the taps and is collected.

4Sugar makers carefully boil the sap over a fire, concentrating watery sap to less than 3% of its original volume to produce the thick, rich syrup.

5. Through a refined straining process, sugar makers remove any impurities from the syrup.

6. Syrup is sealed into our distinctive glass bottles to preserve freshness, taste, and purity as it makes its way from our producers to your home.

One of Tonewoods Special Projects is to ADOPT A Maple Tree

The Tonewood adoption program provides an opportunity to support small maple producers and sustainable farming practices, while enjoying an assortment of Tonewood’s specialty products. When you adopt, you offer small scale producers added financial security, with which they can run, improve, or grow their operations. Maple production is an expensive, specialized, and labor intensive industry, increasingly threatened by competition from inexpensive, imitation syrups and large scale producers, who blend their syrup from multiple sources. By adopting a tree, you can help preserve family-owned farms and the tradition of maple production.

Here is the story of one of the family farms:

Hartshorn Sugarbush has been family-worked and owned for eight generations. This sugarbush is situated on a picturesque mountainside in the Mad River Valley. Due to the steep terrain, the Hartshorns must cope with avalanches, which frequently bury production lines. However, the Hartshorns credit the difficult terrain for their syrup’s superior flavor. The Hartshorns won the coveted Best of Show award at the Vermont Farm Show on the 100th anniversary of Vermont’s Maple Association, and they have accumulated hundreds of awards over the years.

Every year, David Hartshorn and his children tap 5,000 trees and produce roughly 1500 gallons of maple syrup. The family has implemented a modern pipeline network, vacuum system, and reverse osmosis system to increase harvesting efficiency, allowing sugar makers to focus on their craft.

Adopt one of David Hartshorn’s trees for a year and you’ll receive an assortment of gourmet maple products produced at the Hartshorn sugarbush. Proceeds from adoptions support our partnering sugarmakers and fund research to protect future maple production. Adoption provides an opportunity for you to support talented craftsmen and protect the environment, while indulging in a sweet treat.

 

To purchase any of Tonewoods Maple Syrup Products visit our web site at http://shop.cheflippe.com/sugar/  We look forward to seeing you this September at the Farmers Markets.

OUR NEXT NEW FRIENDS are from NY

Charlitos:

Our approach is to work slowly and steadily and make everything from scratch. We like to consider ourselves an incubator for gastronomic ideas. It is in this spirit that we will always strive to explore and experiment with new recipes and new products.

Our intention is to preserve gastronomic tradition and to help integrate it into the time in which we live. Our emphasis is on technique and ingredients. Our products are simple and made with the cleanest, best ingredients we can find, with technique that has survived and evolved through generations.

All of our products are made by hand, slowly, in small batches. You will find a hand-written batch number on every item.

Charlito’s Story is:

About Charlito’s Cocina

Founded in 2011, C.C.’s aim is to explore and utilize the rich gastronomic traditions used to preserve food prior to the days of refrigeration and freezers. It is in the spirit of this robust tradition that we strive to create delicious, shelf stable foods using the cleanest, most well raised ingredients possible.

Because the curing of meat plays such a prominent role in the tradition of food preservation, it is one of our primary focuses. We derive our influence in this category primarily from the curing traditions of Spain, while striving, one product at a time, to distinguish a style that is uniquely our own. All the meat we use is 100% pasture raised, heritage breed pork. The salt we use is all hand harvested fleur de sel.

About “Charlito,” by Charles

After gaining a wealth of knowledge working under two mentor-chefs who produced much of their own charcuterie, I attended the French Culinary Institute in New York City, where I was fortunate to work closely with a master charcutier. After finishing at FCI, I traveled to Spain to study the Spanish tradition of curing meats and preserving food with family in Salamanca and Extremadura who had been curing meats and olives, and making wine, among other things, in their home for generations.

Born Charles Samuel Wekselbaum, and Raised in New York City in a Cuban-American household, I took on the nickname, “Charlito,” derived partially from a difficulty that Spanish speakers close to me seemed to  have pronouncing “Charles,” and partially of a willingness to bestow an affectionate nickname upon “little Charles.” The nickname stuck. It is rife with love, affection, and now, history. The name “Charlito’s Cocina” seemed a most fitting way to give proud and accurate identity to this gastronomic adventure.

One taste of their wonderful salami’s and you will think you are in heaven! We are proud to offer their line of products at http://shop.cheflippe.com/fig-salami/  and we will see you at the Farmer’s Market this September.

And now it time to relax with an old friend!

Melissa Kushi, Founder, President, Sustainable Sourcing, LLC

Melissa Kushi, Founder and President of Sustainable Sourcing, has devoted much of her life’s work to sustainable foods, macrobiotics, and ethical business models. As a social entrepreneur she traveled the world – creating bamboo micro-industries in Africa, replacing coca crops in the jungles of Peru, and introducing Japanese Hokkaido heirloom soybeans to organic farmers in the US.

At an early age, Kushi was trained by the legendary pioneers of the Natural Foods Industry, and leaders of the international Macrobiotic movement, Michio and Aveline Kushi, her father and late mother-in-law. Studying in Japan, she learned the traditional arts of making miso, umeboshi, tofu, and traditional Japanese cooking, where she came to fully understand the value and importance of high quality salt for health and longevity.  She also completed her Masters in Chinese Metaphysics, and was a successful natural foods cooking teacher, macrobiotic educator, and an international organic commodities trader.  Being passionate to share her childhood experiences of growing up on an organic farm in the south, Melissa taught organic gardening at a Rudolf Steiner school, where her children attended.

In her travels and while working with indigenous people, Melissa was inspired by their wealth of ancient knowledge, biodiversity and traditional heirloom foods.  Out of her study and work, she believes that this traditional body of knowledge, combined with today’s cutting edge green technologies, to be key to our collective future. She has also witnessed the effects of adopting a “modern” refined diet in these indigenous communities, and how it has eroded their health, natural farming practices and the rich biodiverse regions they inhabit. Out of this realization, Melissa began to work with communities on the Navajo reservation to create indigenous permaculture projects – bringing in much needed funds, heirloom seeds, low-tech green irrigation systems, and with her children, spent summers working fields of corn, beans, squash, chiles, and other high desert native foods in these communities.

It became clear to her that — as the third world seeks balance and survival, the first world seeks balance and meaning. Creating a circle of compassion and humanity between these two worlds inspired her to create Sustainable Sourcing as a means for nourishing both.

While Kushi possesses expertise at sourcing the highest quality natural products around the globe, she is passionately committed to creating products that bring added social value to consumers.  By providing products that increase wellbeing while making a difference, it helps to close the gap between consumers and the source community.  It also helps to supports and preserves the environment and a more humane, natural way of life.  This is accomplished through her 5% give back, so each time you do something as simple as use HimalaSalt or her organic peppercorns, you are making a difference on the planet.

Melissa has worked diligently to design her product lines with the least impact on the earth, leaving the smallest footprint possible.  All packaging is either 100% recycled, recyclable, refillable, or reusable, and her entire operation is offset with wind and solar certified by the Green-e.  Going far beyond the requirements for certification, which offsets electrical use only, Melissa, with the help of the Bonneville Environmental Foundation, has offset every aspect of her company’s fossil fuel consumption by calculating annual use for production, the creation of packaging, ocean freight, trucking, travel and shows, marketing, and what it takes to operate her new certified organic, kosher passover certified artisan production facility in the beautiful Berkshire Mountains of New England.

Melissa continues to support the renewal of traditional diet in indigenous regions as a way to recover health, biodiversity, and to create heirloom food security, with ongoing projects on Native American reservations and in the Himalayas.

Enjoy the video on massage with hot Himalayan salt stones and when your ready visit us at http://shop.cheflippe.com/himalayan-sea-salt-massage-stones/  to get your set.

All of our vendors and friends have one similar goal, to provide you with the best product, with the least amount of harm to either the animals or the planet.  At the convention I would tell the vendor that I wanted to be able to meet “Betsy” the cow and if Betsy and I liked each other then we could do business.  If they did not understand this way of doing business then I moved on.  I hope you take the time to visit our online store and meet some of our wonderful friends.  We look forward to seeing you again in September at the farmers Market.

 Himalayan Salt Stone Massage

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Filed under Artisan Maple Syrup and Sugar, Artisan Sausage, Chef Lippe, Food blog, gluten free, health through eating, heart health, Himalayan salt cooking, Maple sugar, maple syrup, Uncategorized

Lemon Pepper Linguine with Asparagus Pesto

Lemon Pepper Linguine with Asparagus Pesto

By Chef Lippe

Here is a light lunch that is healthy and tastes good. Here are some interesting facts about asparagus:

  • The Indian name for asparagus is Shatavari (she who possesses a hundred husbands)
  • Is high in fiber (easier to eat than a fiber supplement)
  • Helps to detoxify the liver
  • Is high in glutathione (powerful antioxidant)
  • Excellent source of B vitamins, which help manage blood sugar
  • Excellent source of vitamin K, important for bone health

Do you like yours thick or thin?

I like mine thicker and my mother likes hers thin. I personally think the thicker ones are sweeter and find the thin ones stringier. Usually the thicker stalks come from the male plant and the thin ones from a female plant (multi-tasking by producing seeds gives the plant less time to grow thicker stalks).  The same as with humans, big strong males and smaller females.

Ingredients:

 

2 pounds of Chef Lippe’s Lemon pepper linguine

2 bunches of asparagus, cut into pieces

4 cloves of garlic

½ cup almonds toasted

1 cup parmesan cheese

1 pinch of garlic roasted sea salt

½ cup extra virgin olive oil

Directions:

  • Bring large pot of salted water to a boil. Cook asparagus water until crisp-tender about 3 minutes. Remove asparagus from water and dry (save to cook pasta in)
  • Once asparagus is cooled transfer to food processor, add garlic, almonds, cheese, salt and pepper and oil. Blend until pesto consistency.
  • Let cool
  • Cook pasta al dente, drain and toss with pesto.
  • Serve room temperature or hot.

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Filed under Artisan pasta, asparagus, Food, Food blog, health through eating, recipes

101 forgotten uses for salt

By Chef Lippe

Bolivian Rose Salt Having lived in Bolivia for several years as a child I did not appreciate it as much as I did when visiting family as an adult.  Soon we will be carrying salt cellars and other items made with salt from the Andes. The internet claims that there are over 14,000 ways to use salt. Today I will give you a few of my favorite ways and share with you some information about the salt that we get from Bolivia. I hope you enjoy and if you are ever in this part of the world a visit to the salt hotel is well worth it.  Bolivian Rose salt is found in Tarija, in southern Bolivia. 

Bolivian salt is rich in taste and has many uses with its high mineral content.  In 100 grams of salt you get 3.3mg of Iron, 477mg of calcium, 38.6mg of Sodium and 432mg of Potassium.  Rose salt has less sodium per serving than other salts which makes it popular with those of us who are over 50. Also in southern Bolivia is the Uyuni Lake. Bolivia currently produces 8500 tons of salt per year from this lake.

This salt is millions of years old and is found high in the Andes Mountains, where the salt deposits where covered with volcanic lava creating its high mineral content and protecting it from pollution.  Salar de Uyuni is the world’s largest salt flat and covers over 4,000 square miles and can be seen from space.  30,000 plus years ago this area was part of a giant prehistoric lake. When the lake dried up it left behind two lakes and two salt deserts. Salar de Uyuni is one which is roughly 25 times the size of the Salt flats in the US. In 1993 they built an entire hotel of salt right in the middle of the salt flat. Everything from the walls, floors and roof are made of salt blocks.  Tables and chairs and other furniture all made from salt. Here are some of my favorite uses for salt, but many of them have been replaced by modern chemicals and cleaners:

  • Salt added to water makes it boil at a higher temperature, thus reducing the cooking time.
  • Eggs boiled in salt water peel easier.
  • Poaching eggs over salted water helps set the egg white.
  • To see how fresh your eggs are place an egg in a cup of water which has 2 teaspoons of salt added, a fresh egg will sink.
  • Cleaning a greasy pan will wash easily if you sprinkle with salt and wipe it with a paper towel first.
  • Rubbing your coffee or tea cups with salt will remove the stains.
  • If you have burned something in your oven, while still hot sprinkle with salt and cinnamon to take away the odor. When dry use a stiff brush to clean.
  • Salt tossed on a grease fire will extinguish it.
  • A pinch of salt added to your coffee will enhance the flavor and remove the bitterness of overcooked coffee.
  • Clean copper pans by sprinkling with salt and using a cloth soaked in vinegar.
  • Remove onion odors from fingers rubbing them with vinegar and salt.
  • Adding a pinch of salt to your milk will keep it fresh longer.
  • You can remove rings from your tables left from wet or hot dishes or glasses by rubbing a thin paste of salad oil and salt on the spot with your fingers and let it stand for an hour or two.
  • Brighten your yellowed linens or cottons by boiling them with salt and baking soda.
  • Remove mildew or rust stains by rubbing with a mixture of lemon juice and salt, let dry in sun and then rinse and dry.
  • And our last tip for the day is called salabrasion; this technique done by a Dr. can remove a tattoo with virtually no scarring.

In yesterday’s blog “Cooking on a Himalayan salt block” http://wp.me/p2n8ji-3V we talked about cooking on salt and the added taste that is received by doing so.  Today I have listed lots of ways to use salt in and around the house that many of us did not know about. Ask your grandmother and I am sure that she will remember some of them. Tomorrow I will talk about the health benefits of certain salts. In the meantime enjoy these pictures of Bolivia’s salt lake. 

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Filed under Bolivia, Chef Lippe, Food, Food blog, health through eating, travel