Tag Archives: chili

Honey Lime Chicken Enchiladas with Green Sauce

Honey Lime Chicken Enchiladas with Green Sauce

By Chef Lippe

 

In the hot summer months I like to use my crockpot a lot, it frees up my day to spend time at the beach or in the pool and still have a great meal.  Chicken is one of my favorite items to slow cook.  I put chicken thighs with skin and bones to start my enchiladas and let them slow cook on low for about 3 hours more if frozen.  Then I let them cool so I can pull out the bones and skins later in the day for the enchiladas.

Ingredients for Green Sauce:

3 Tablespoons virgin olive oil

1 large onion, minced

6 cloves garlic, minced

2 green peppers chopped

2 jalapenos, (seeds and ribs removed for mild sauce)

1 ½ pounds small tomatillos, husked and quartered

½ bunch of cilantro, rough chopped

1 ½ teaspoons sea salt

¼ teaspoon black pepper

1 ½ teaspoon cumin

4 cups chicken broth

2 Tablespoons sugar

 

In a large saucepan, sauté onions until tender in oil.

 

While onions are sautéing combine tomatillos, green and jalapeno peppers, cilantro in a blender and process until smooth (you can add some of the chicken broth if you need more liquid to make it smooth)

 

Add garlic to onion mixture in saucepan and cook until fragrant.

 

Pour in tomatillo mixture.

 

Add chicken broth, salt, pepper and cumin and simmer uncovered up to an hour, depends on the consistency you like.  I like about 30 minutes but have gone as long as an hour.

 

Cool can be made a few days ahead and refrigerated.

 

Ingredients for Enchiladas:

 

2 pounds cooked and shredded chicken (about 4 pounds of chicken thighs)

1/3 cup honey

¼ cup lime juice

1 Tablespoon chili powder

1 ½ cups green sauce

4 to 5 cups of mozzarella and cheddar cheese shredded and mixed together

Flour tortillas

 

Mix together 2 cups of sauce with honey, lime and chili.

 

Add 1 cup to shredded chicken and let soak for about 30 minutes

 

Spray oil onto a 9 x 13 baking dish add ½ cup sauce to coat bottom of baking dish.

 

Fill tortillas with shredded meat and desired amount of cheese. Roll and place in baking dish.  Repeat this step making as many as you need.

 

Pour remainder of sauce over enchiladas and sprinkle with more cheese.

 

Bake uncovered at 350 for 30 minutes.

 

For last 5 minutes place under broiler to make cheese nice and brown.

 

Enjoy.

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Filed under Artisan Cheese, Chef Lippe, Chile Powder, Food, Mozzarella, olive oil, Pepper, recipes, Slow Food

Grapeseed Oil for Heart Healthy Fried Faba Bean Snack

By Chef Lippe

Grapeseed Oil

Grapeseed oil has been a well kept secret of gourmet chefs for a long time. It is light and nutty, yet neutral flavor and has the ability to enhance the flavor of a recipe without overpowering them.  It leaves no greasy aftertaste! Which makes it excellent for marinades and salad dressings. Grapeseed oil has a high smoke point (485 F) making it ideal for hot food preparation such as frying and sautéing without smoking. No more setting of the smoke alarms!

Grapeseed oil is made from the seeds of grapes after the wine is pressed. There is no need for hybrid or genetically engineered crops and it does not require additional usage of farmland or water to produce.

Grapeseed oil is high in vitamin E and is 76% essential fatty acid, linoleic acid (also known as Omega 6), low in saturated fat.  It contains natural chlorophyll and valuable antioxidants known as proanthocyninidins. Studies have shown that these antioxidants can significantly raise HDL cholesterol (good cholesterol) and lower LDL cholesterol (bad cholesterol) and triglycerides and may even lower your risk of cardiovascular disease and impotency!

Grapeseed oil has the ability to slow down and reverse free radical damage and reduce the risk of heart disease and slow down skin aging. It is 50 times more potent than Vitamin E and 20 times more effective than Vitamin C in destroying free radicals that roam the body and damage cells.  Additional studies have shown that grapeseed oil can help protect the body from sun damage, improve vision, improve joint flexibility, improve blood circulation and reduce allergic and asthmatic symptoms by inhibiting the formation of histmines.

It contains NO cholesterol, NO sodium and NO preservatives. It is NOT hydrogenated and contains NO solvents, NO trans-fatty acids or free fatty acids. In other words it is so much better for us than any other type of oil.

Grapeseed oil has long been used to promote health.  Some believed it to be an ingredient in a dish know as pulse, and the Old Testament tells us that the prophet Daniel preferred eating this dish over others in order to stay healthy.  To this day, grapeseed oil is used in many cosmetics and skin care products promoting healthy skin.

Pulses are dishes that include chickpeas, peas, lentils, beans and lupins. Pulses are low fat, high fiber, no cholesterol, low glycemic index, high protein, high nutrient foods.  They are excellent foods for people managing diabetes, heart disease or coeliac disease.

Enjoy and know that you are eating healthy!

Faba Nuts

This traditional crunchy snack is popular throughout Northern Africa and the Middle East. They are simple to prepare and provide a tasty alternative to the salted nuts often served with drinks.

Serves: 6
Preparation: 1 hour
Cooking: 20 – 25 mins
Legume Lead-In: Soak whole or split dried faba beans overnight in three times their volume of water. Beans should be consistent size for even frying. Kabuli chickpeas can also be used as a substitute or combine the two types when done for a tasty medley.

Ingredients

  • Desired quantity of faba beans and / or kabuli chickpeas
  • Grapeseed oil roasted garlic

Seasoning

  • Garlic salt
  • Chicken salt
  • Black pepper
  • Cayenne pepper
  • Chilli powder
  • Cumin and / or coriander

Instructions

  1. Deep fry in very hot grapeseed oil. Caution: Cover pot while faba beans are frying or be prepared to clean your entire kitchen! Some pop like popcorn.
  2. Cooking time varies according to bean size. Try a few first to get the precise cooking time – our testers found 2 minutes was too short and 3 minutes too long for their conditions. The bean should reach consistency of a roasted chestnut.
  3. When cooked, spead on paper towel to absorb excess oil.
  4. Lightly salt or spice as desired.
  5. Once cooled, Faba Nuts will remain crisp in airtight container.

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Filed under cayenne pepper, Chef Lippe, Chile Powder, Faba Bean, Food, Grapeseed Oil, health through eating, heart health, Pepper, recipes, spices

Chili and Maple Syrup Baked Pork Chops

Chili Maple Pork Chops

By Chef Lippe

While at the Fancy Food Show in Washington, DC the other day I met with a young company who sold Maple Syrup products. I very impressed and wanted to work with the company when she told me that a portion of all sales went into funding climate research, local farming efforts and sustainable forest stewardship.  All of these things are important to me when I choose which Artisan products I want to work with. And while I was not looking to add maple syrup to my store I did change my mind and you will soon be seeing a line of GREAT maple syrup products. In the meantime here is a great combination of chili and maple syrup.

 Ingredients:

6 – I inch thick pork chops

¼ cup chopped onion

1 tablespoon vinegar

1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce

1 and ½ teaspoons sea salt

½ teaspoon chili powder

1/8 teaspoon black pepper

¼ cup maple syrup

¼ cup water

Directions:

Preheat oven to 400 degrees.  In large fraying pan lightly brown pork chops.  Arrange in flat baking dish which has a cover or cover with foil to bake.  Mix together onion, vinegar, Worcestershire Sauce, salt, chili powder, pepper, maple syrup and water, pour over pork chops cover and bake 45 minutes. Basting occasionally. Uncover and bake 15 more minutes.  Remove pork chops to a plate. Pour sauce back into frying pan and thicken with flour, making a gravy. Pour over pork chops and serve.

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Filed under Chef Lippe, Chile Powder, Food, Food blog, maple syrup, Pepper, Pork, recipes

Pork shoulder with chocolate chili sauce

Pork shoulder with chocolate chili sauce

By Chef Lippe

This dish takes a long time to cook and some advanced planning to get all the ingredients but is so worth the effort!  The chocolate stout is the hardest ingredient to find and if not handy at your local beer shop can be ordered on the internet.  Order some extra because as bad as chocolate beer sounds it actually tastes great.  The day before you plan to eat this you need to start.  The pork shoulder needs to marinate at least 12 hours in with the dry rub and it will have to slow cook for another 8 hours the next day.

Ingredients:

5 pound pork shoulder, trimmed

Olive oil

1 tablespoon brown sugar

4 tablespoons chili powder, (1 reserved)

2 teaspoons ground cayenne pepper, (½ teaspoon reserved)

Salt and pepper to taste

2 14.9 ounce cans Double Chocolate Stout, (1 reserved for chef and this can be found on the internet if your local shop does not carry)

1 and ½ cups orange juice (reserve ¾ cup)

1 and ½ cup chicken stock (reserve ¾ cup)

1 medium onion, roughly chopped

4 medium carrots, 2 roughly chopped, 2 julienned

2 celery stalks, roughly chopped

6 to 8 garlic cloves, smashed

2 jalapeno peppers, roughly chopped

1 red bell pepper, julienned

2 tablespoons tomato paste

1 ounce of 60& or greater chocolate, grated (about 4 squares of a Lindt bar)

1 tablespoon butter

Chocolate pasta

Directions:

Wash and pat dry pork shoulder, trim excess fat from shoulder and lightly coat in olive oil

Liberally apply salt to shoulder. Combine the brown sugar, chili powder and cayenne pepper  once mixed rub onto the shoulder.

Wrap in plastic wrap and refrigerate overnight.

The first thing the next morning place pork shoulder in a slow cooker.

Add the chocolate stout, orange juice and stock , add onion, roughly chopped carrot, celery, garlic and jalapenos.

Cook on low for 7 to 8 hours.

When done cooking strain/separate the fat from the braising liquid. Add braising liquid and reserved orange juice and stock to medium sauce pan and start reducing.

Once this mixture has reduced by half, whisk in tomato paste.  Taste and adjust spices if necessary

Whisk in grated chocolate and butter, once melted remove from heat.

Bring a pot of salted water to a boil while shredding the meat.

Shred the pork, add in the remaining chili and cayenne powder and toss together, add ¼ of the sauce and heat the meat up.

While you are heating meat back up add pasta to boiling water and cook al dente.

To serve this dish, place chocolate pasta on a large platter, cover with meat and cooked onions and carrots, add remaining sauce and then top julienned vegetables, grate some more chocolate over the top as if it where cheese.

Enjoy!

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Filed under cayenne pepper, Chef Lippe, Chile Powder, Chili Powder, chocolate, chocolate pasta, Food, Food blog, pork shoulder, recipes, slow cooking, Slow Food

All things BACON!

All things BACON!

By Chef Lippe

Everyone in my house loves bacon.  We have made chocolate with candied bacon. We even add some chili powder to give it a little bite.  We have made praline bacon, bacon ice cream, bacon butter, bacon jam and the list goes on.

I know that the war on bacon is good for you or bad for you it still on going, which over the last few years bacon is about 30% leaner now than it used to be.  Then cooking removes another 30% and a crispy slice of bacon is now about 30 to 40 calories per slice.  However, we are treating bacon as an ingredient in a VERY sweet dish today and we are not going to count the calories! Then there is the warning about bacon and cancer.  Bacon is considered a red meat, it is processed (smoked) and it is fatty all the reasons why you should avoid it. But it TASTES so good that a little snack now and then won’t hurt you.

So here are two of my favorite bacon recipes enjoy! (Eat in moderation if you can )

Chocolate chili covered candied bacon

Ingredients:

  • 1/2 pound thinly sliced applewood smoked Bacon
  • 1 cup firmly packed Brown Sugar
  • 1 teaspoon chili powder (optional)
  • 1/2 pound of chocolate melting chips (Pure Belgian Chocolate or any other of your choice)

** Note your amounts will vary depending on how many chocolates you wish to make.

Instructions:

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Line cookie sheet with parchment paper (you really need this)

Lay your bacon strips out making sure not to overlap them. Layer each strip of bacon with a thick coating of brown sugar, rubbing it into the bacon.

Place bacon into preheated oven for 10 minutes. Flip bacon and cover new side with syrup and juices. Cook 10 more minutes.

Allow bacon to cool on wire rack. For easy cleanup, place the wire rack over the parchment paper the bacon was cooked on.

Once bacon has cooled, is brittle and tastes oh-so-yummy, crumble or roughly chop the bacon and place a sprinkling of bacon bits in each mold.

In the meantime, prepare a double boiler using a pot and metal bowl. Fill the pot with water, place the bowl in the pot – the bowl should not touch the water. Heat on low-medium heat.

Once bowl is heated place chocolate discs inside to begin melting. Stir often to avoid burning or seizing. Once chocolate has melted, pour into each mold, being sure to tap the molds after each is filled (to knock out any air bubbles). Sprinkle in some more bacon bits, press them into the mixture and place in the fridge to cool.

Bacon Ice Cream

For the ice cream custard:
3 tablespoons salted butter
¾ cup (packed) brown sugar, light or dark (you can use either)
2¾ cup half-and-half
5 large egg yolks
2 teaspoons dark rum or whiskey
¼ teaspoon vanilla extract
optional: ¼ teaspoon ground cinnamon

Use candied bacon made earlier  Once crisp and cool, chop into little pieces, about the size of grains of rice.

To make the ice cream custard, melt the butter in a heavy, medium-size saucepan. Stir in the brown sugar and half of the half-and-half. Pour the remaining half-and-half into a bowl set in an ice bath and set a mesh strainer over the top.

In a separate bowl, stir together the egg yolks, then gradually add some of the warm brown sugar mixture to them, whisking the yolks constantly as you pour. Pour the mixture back into the saucepan.

Cook over low to moderate heat, constantly stirring and scraping the bottom with a heatproof spatula, until the custard thickens enough to coat the spatula.

Strain the custard into the half-and-half, stirring over the ice bath, until cool. Add liquor, vanilla and cinnamon, if using.

Refrigerate the mixture. Once thoroughly chilled, freeze in your ice cream maker according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Add the bacon bits during the last moment of churning, or stir them in when you remove the ice cream from the machine.

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Filed under Bacon Ice Cream, Chef Lippe, Chile Powder, chocolate bacon, Food, Food blog, recipes

Olive oil fusion vs. infusion

What is the confusion about Fusion vs. Infusion

Definition:

adjective (of food or cooking) combining usually widely differing ethnicor regional ingredients, styles, or techniques: a restaurantserving French-Thai fusion cuisine; a fusion menu.

infusion [ihn-FYOO-zhuhn] An infusion is the flavor that’s extracted from an ingredient such as tea leaves, herbs or fruit by stepping them in a liquid (usually hot), such as water, for tea. In today’s culinary parlance, sauces that have been variously flavored (as with herbs) are also called infusions.

In olive oil “fused” is also referred to as “agrumato” in Italy. Agrumato olive oil is made by crushing ripe, sound olives with whole, fresh fruits, herbs or vegetables at the time of crush.  If you were to spilt lemons and mix with the olive at the time of the crush, this process allows for the essential oils from the citrus peel to mingle with the oil from the olives.  The result would be a mix of about 20% oil which is separated from the water, and the result is a bright, fresh fused lemon citrus olive oil.

“Infusion” is the process of adding flavor to olive oil after it has been made.  This is the most common kind of olive oil made.  It makes great gifts and adds nice flavors when cooking.  The secret in making good infused olive oil in good quality ingredients.  I like to use extra virgin olive oil.

How to make your own infused olive oil

This can be so much fun but you will need to take care and make them safely.  You can freeze infused oil in an ice cube tray after straining to preserve it for use later, just pull out a cube and add to your recipe.

Just like canning, infusing oil can encourage the growth of botulism bacteria, particularly when using fresh ingredients. To prevent this there are a few simple steps you need to use:

  • Home infused oils should always be immediately refrigerated and used within a week.
  • Make sure your hands, ingredients and work surfaces and tools are clean.
  • Make sure ingredients are dry. Water in the oil will encourage rancidity.
  • Sterilize your jars. (hold them in boiling water at 250 degrees.

There are two ways to infuse your oil, one with heat and a cold process. In both a good ratio for ingredients is 1:4. So ¼ cup of flavoring with 1 cup of oil.

With Heat:

The easiest way is to just cook your ingredients in sizzling oil for 5 minutes, then strain into your container.

Or

Wash and dry ingredients, then bruise them and place in a sterile jar. Gently heat oil over low heat until just warm (1 to 5 minutes depending on quantity of oil). Allow to cool slightly, then pour into the jar making sure all flavorings are completely submerged. Cover tightly and allow to steep in the refrigerator for a couple of hours to a couple of days before straining into a new, clean container. (longer steeping yields stronger flavors).

Without heat:

Cold-process oils are best used with dried ingredients. You can pour the oil straight over the herbs. Wash and dry ingredients and place in a blender with oil until all ingredients are evenly broken up, pour into sterile jar. Cover tightly and allow to steep in refrigerator for a couple of days before straining into a new clean container.

Have fun and be safe when making your own infused oils and be sure to buy your dried chili from Chef Lippe.

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Chili Powder vs Chile Powder……whats the big deal?

By Chef Lippe @ www.shop.cheflippe.com

“What’s the difference between chili powder and chile powder?”

Now we know that if 1 or 2 visitors to our site took the time to contact us and ask these questions there are many more who have at least thought the same thing but didn’t ask. So we have an opportunity to share some knowledge and do a better job of explaining the differences between the two.

A chile powder is the powder from the ground chile. For example our Ancho Chile Powder is only the ground Ancho chile. Nothing else. No other ingredients, no fillers, no anti-caking agents. Just pure powder.

This is also true of chile flakes. These will just be the particular chile ground down to a flake such as cayenne and ancho peppers.

A chili powder on the other hand is a seasoning blend that contains a chile powder (or sometimes two or three different chiles) as a base and then other ingredients are added in to round out the flavor profile. These other ingredients are usually some combination of cumin, coriander, onion, garlic and Mexican oregano. You may also find some additional ingredients in some chili powder. Like all of our all natural hand blended seasonings you will never find any MSG, anti-caking agents, or preservatives.

We love to hear from those in search of spices, herbs and chiles and actually several of the new chiles mentioned above are being added because of customer requests to stock them.

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