Tag Archives: fresh pasta

Drunken Goat

drunken goat 2

Drunken Goat is a most unusual goat cheese.  So you ask, “What’s with the name?” Perhaps you have images of goats weaving about the pasture, teetering, perhaps sparring, and maybe snoozing on their backs with hooves in the air pointing to azure blue skies. But just to clear the air, neither wine, nor any other form of spirit is fed to the goats. The name is a figurative one, referring to the manner in which this goat cheese soaks up the sumptuous red wine in which it’s bathed. Drunken Goat comes from the Murcia region of Spain, which is famous for its Doble Pasta wine as well as its excellent goat’s milk. The milk used to make this cheese comes exclusively from Murciana goats. It is high in both fat and protein, giving this cheese its amazing creaminess. Drunken Goat is aged for a short period of time before being immersed in the Doble Pasta wine for 72 hours or so. The result not only adds flavor to the cheese, it also imparts an incredibly stunning violet color to the rind. Usually rinds are various shades of brown or cream, sometimes with moldy patches of blue. It is definitely unique for a cheese to have such a brilliantly colored, violet rind. Some have likened the hue to the fiery sunsets seen in the region where it is made. After the cheese has had its luxury Doble Pasta bath, it’s then aged for an additional 75 days to allow full maturation and intermingling of the cheese and wine flavors.

TASTING NOTES

The Doble Pasta wine, which once bathed your Drunken Goat, is a young wine with pronounced flavors. It gives the cheese both its color and its flavor. You can expect to smell the aroma and taste the wine in the finish of the cheese. The flavor begins mild and oh-so-creamy, but finishes with a wonderful tangy sweetness and a fruity, luscious, grapey aroma. Serve it with desserts or as an appetizer.  Pairs with medium fruity red wine, chorizo, almonds and olives. Try using this cheese in your next grilled cheese with a little tapenade.

Cheese Type: Semi-soft

Milk Type: Goat

Rennet: animal

Age: 75 days

Origin: Spain

Region: Murcia

drunken goat crostini

Fig and Drunken Goat Crostini:

By Jamie Oliver

  • 1/2 baguette, sliced at a diagonal, 1/2″thick
  • olive oil
  • 1 pint of figs, washed and stemmed
  • 3 Tablespoons creme fraiche
  • 1 egg yolk
  • 1/2 teaspoon dry mustard powder
  • 3/4 cup shredded drunken goat cheese (or manchego, or campo)
  • salt and pepper
  • drizzle of vegetarian worcestershire sauce, or balsamic vinegar
  • finely chopped rosemary, or thyme

Directions:

  • preheat the broiler. drizzle a bit of olive oil and a sprinkle of salt on the sliced bread, and toast under the broiler very slightly on both sides. cover a baking sheet with foil, and place or arrange the toasts on it.
  • thinly slice up all the pretty figs – each toast will use 3-4 slices. quarter the rest of the figs and scoop out their guts. spread these on the toast.
  • mix together the creme fraiche, egg, mustard, and shredded cheese. season with salt and pepper. spread this mixture on the toast, covering it completely to the edges. broil the toasts until the cheese is bubbly and dark golden. remove the toasts from the broiler and let cool slightly. top each toast with a few sliced figs and a pinch of rosemary.

there’s enough cheese sauce in this recipe for at least a dozen small toasts. depending on how stingy you are with it, you could get up to 20.

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Filed under Artisan Cheese, Chef Lippe, Drunken Goat, Drunken Goat Crostini, figs, goat cheese

Pasta for Dinner or Dessert???

By Chef Lippe

Yes I know, that I am crazy (mash potato fudge and chocolate pasta with chilli sauce) but this was a big hit for desert the other night! Now that I make and sell pasta 24/7 (at least it feels that way) I always have fresh pasta around the house and thought a desert might be good with some of the lemon fettuccini I made last week. Besides, pasta is made from flour and eggs, the basis of Western pastries, so there is no reason why it shouldn’t work. I decided to give it a try.  I have also included a second recipe where I cooked the pasta into a cake. Enjoy!

sweet pasta

Ingredients

1 pint half-and-half

1 lemon, zested

1 orange, zested

2 tablespoons honey

1 pinch kosher salt

12 ounces linguine, fresh (or fettuccini)

1 tablespoon lemon juice

3 ounces semisweet chocolate

1/4 cup hazelnuts (chopped and toasted) (optional)

Directions

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil.

In a large heavy skillet heat the cream, zests, honey and salt over medium heat, being careful not to boil the cream. Stir occasionally for about 4 minutes.

While this is cooking add fresh pasta to boiling water and cook for 2 to 3 minutes. Drain pasta and add to skillet.

Add lemon juice and stir to combine. Place on severing dishes, add shaved chocolate and hazelnuts.

 

Sweet Pasta Cake

sweet pasta cake

Ingredients

10 ounces fresh linguine
Olive oil for greasing
4 tablespoons of Amaretto liquor
½ cup raisins
4 eggs
½ cup sugar
¼ cup almonds, chopped
Zest of 1 orange
4 granny smith apples
Juice of ½ lemon
4 tablespoons of sugar
Salt

Directions

Place the raisins in a small bowl and pour over the Amaretto liquor. Leave to soak for 10 minutes.

Preheat the oven at 350 degrees.

Peel, core and coarsely grate the apples. Place in a bowl and squeeze over the lemon juice (so that they do not turn brown).

Line a 8 x 8 cake pan with baking parchment and lightly brush with oil.

In a large saucepan, cook the linguine in the salted boiling water. Drain and rinse under cold water. Set aside.

Meanwhile, in a large bowl lightly beat the eggs with the sugar. Add in the almonds, the orange zest and the raisins with the Amaretto liquor. At last fold in the pasta and the grated apples.

Pour the mixture in the cake pan, cover with foil and bake for 40 minutes.

Once the 40 minutes are up, remove the foil, sprinkle with sugar and continue to bake for a further 10 minutes until lightly browned and crispy on top.

Let cake rest for 15 minutes before cutting.

 

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Filed under Artisan pasta, chocolate, Homemade, Lemon, Pasta, pasta sauces, recipes

Veal Piccata

By Chef Lippe

veal-piccata-with-lemon-capers-and-parsley-butter-sauce

Veal Piccata is classic comfort food that can be served with pasta, or with buttered noodles, or mashed potatoes. It’s made with thin veal cutlets that are first browned in butter and then simmered in a tangy, lemony sauce.  Depending on how thin the veal cutlets are to start with, you can ask your butcher to flatten them for you, or you can do it yourself at home.  You can also use chicken in this dish.  I love flavored fresh pasta and usually use a garlic with lemon or spinach.

Prep Time: 15 minutes

Cook Time: 10 minutes

Total Time: 25 minutes

Ingredients:

  • 8 small veal cutlets (about 2 oz. each), pounded flat
  • 1 large sweet onion, peeled and chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic, peeled and crushed
  • 2 Tablespoons olive oil
  • ½ cup all-purpose flour
  • 2 Tablespoons butter
  • ½ cup dry sherry (see note)
  • 1 lemon
  • 2 Tablespoons capers
  • 1 cup veal stock or chicken stock
  • 2 Tablespoons Italian parsley, finely chopped
  • Sea salt to taste
  • Freshly ground white pepper, to taste

Preparation:

Squeeze the juice from the lemon and set the juice aside.

To flatten the cutlets: Stretch a piece of plastic wrap across your work surface, place the veal cutlets on it, and lay another piece of plastic wrap on top. Then, using a meat mallet, rolling pin or similar object, flatten the cutlets between the layers of plastic wrap until they are about ¼ inch thick.

Combine the flour, salt and pepper on a plate or in a shallow baking dish.

Heat a heavy-bottomed sauté pan over medium-high heat for a minute, then add the olive oil and heat for another 30 seconds or so. Add the onion and garlic to the pan and sauté until the onion is slightly translucent, about 3 minutes. Remove the onion and garlic from the pan and set them aside.

Add the butter to the pan and let it heat until it turns foamy.

Now dredge both sides of the veal cutlets in the flour mixture, shake off any excess flour and add them, one at a time, to the hot pan. Work in batches if necessary, rather than overcrowding the pan. Cook 2 to 3 minutes per side or until the cutlets are nicely browned. Remove them from the pan and set aside on a plate, covered with foil, while you make the sauce.

Add the stock, sherry, lemon juice and capers to the pan and scrape off any flavorful bits from the bottom of the pan. Then return the onion-garlic mixture to the pan and heat it through, adding a bit more oil or butter if necessary.

Return the veal to the pan, bring the liquid to a boil, then lower it to a simmer and cook for about 3 minutes or until the mixture has reduced by about one-third. Add the chopped parsley just at the end of the cooking.

With a pair of tongs, remove the veal cutlets and plate them, two cutlets per person. Adjust the seasoning on the sauce with salt and lemon juice. Sauce generously and serve immediately.

Makes 4 servings (two cutlets per person).

 

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How to cook our fresh pasta

HOW TO COOK FRESH PASTA

Everyone has a different idea of what cooked pasta should taste like so you should sample yours and adjust to your taste.

Al Dente is when you can see a little growth in your pasta.  It will be firm and a little chewy.  Sacrifice yourself and ALWAYS taste your fresh pasta before serving.   (Remember your mom always taking a piece out of the boiling water and tasting it before she took it off the heat?  You want your pasta to be perfect!)

  1. Use plenty of water in a large pot. (At least 1 gallon per pound of pasta)
  2. Add salt to water if desired. Sea salt is always better if you have it. (1/2 tablespoon per quart of water)
  3. Add oil (I like a good olive oil, but any oil is okay) 1 teaspoon per quart of water.  This helps to keep the pasta from sticking together.
  4. Bring water to a boil. If you cover the pot it will boil faster but not a necessary step.
  5. Add fresh pasta. If your pasta is packed tightly gently loosen before adding to boiling water.  Once you add pasta to boiling water stir once or twice.
  6. Watch your pasta closely. Some of the thinner pasta will be Al Dente already, some of the thicker pasta will need a little longer.
  7. TASTE your pasta to see if it is done.
  8. Drain and add to sauce. Remember your pasta will continue to cook when added to your hot sauce.  Rinse your pasta only if you are making a cold salad or want to store for later use.

 

HOW TO COOK FRESH RAVIOLI

  1. Use plenty of water in a large pot. (At least 1 gallon per pound of pasta).
  2. Add salt to water if desired. Sea salt is always better if you have it. (1/2 tablespoon per quart of water).
  3. Add oil (I like a good olive oil, but any oil is okay) 1 teaspoon per quart of water.  This helps to keep the pasta from sticking together.
  4. Bring water to a boil. If you cover the pot it will boil faster but not a necessary step.
  5. If your ravioli comes in a sheet then gently brake the pieces off, first brake off a row then break into individual pieces.  If your ravioli is already separated then just pour into boiling water.
  6. Do not cover or stir. If paper got into water gently remove with wooden spoon.
  7. Bring water back to a boil. Once water is boiling stir gently to break an pieces still stuck together.
  8. Check to see if they are cooked to your taste. Generally they are Al Dente once water comes back to a boil.
  9. Drain gently and add to sauce.

 

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Filed under Artisan pasta, Chef Lippe, Food, Food blog, Pasta, recipes