Tag Archives: goat chese

Asparagus and Cheese Dip

asparagus dip

For those moms who can’t get their kids to eat healthy food this is a great dip made with fresh Asparagus, parmesan cheese and almonds.  Serve over a colorful pasta or with vegetable sticks. Asparagus has a lot of nutritional values, the potassium in it can lower your blood pressure and It’s also rich in soluble fiber to help lower blood cholesterol levels.

Ingredients:

1 bunch of asparagus, cut into pieces and cooked

2 cloves of garlic

¼ cup almonds toasted

1 cup parmesan cheese

1 pinch of garlic roasted sea salt

½ cup sour cream

½ cup cream cheese

Directions:

Cook asparagus in boiling water until crisp-tender about 3 minutes. Remove asparagus from water and dry.

Once asparagus is cooled transfer to food processor, add garlic, almonds, cheeses, salt and pepper and sour cream. Blend until pesto consistency.

This is a tasty creamy preparation that does well as a dip for parties or used as a topping instead of pesto.  It can also be baked at 350 until bubbly and served hot.

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Banon Cheese

banon village

It is rumored that Emperor Antoninus Pius who died in 161BC, died from eating too much Banon Cheese.

What makes this unpasteurized  goat cheese so special you ask?  It is the way they make it and it has been made this way for a very long time.   The cheese was first made by a couple in the village of Puimichel near the town of Banon in the region of Alpes-de-Haute Provence.

The unpressed curd is placed in an earthenware jar and seasoned with salt and pepper and doused with vinegar and eau de vie, a clear fruit brandy then left to ferment. The cheese will last for years becoming stronger with time.The cheese when young taste sour and chalky, but let it age and you have a little piece of heaven. After a few weeks the young cheese is wrapped in chestnut leaves to continue the ageing process.

How can you tell a good Banon Cheese? By the color of the leaves. Dark green or brown are the best.  It is very soft and creamy with a fruity and slightly nutty taste and a pungent aroma. The taste and texture change with age.  The rumor says that if you taste this cheese during the month of May while in France at the Banon Cheese festival you will forever yearn to return to Banon.

You can be certain when purchasing Banon cheese from France that you will always get a similar product. The French, who awarded Banon the AOC, or term of controlled origin in the 2000s, regulates the production of the cheese. This means that only certain cheese meeting the French standards for the production of Banon cheese, may be called so. The French regulate all aspects of how, where and when Banon can be produced and labeled within their country.

The word Banon is pronounced ban-awh. The final n as in many French words is not pronounced. You may also find Banon cheese called Banon à la feuille, translated as cheese of the leaf or cheese with a sheet. It is sold in small rounds that are traditionally wrapped with chestnut or grape leaves to enhance the flavor of the cheese and keep it moist, which hastens the production of molds adding even more flavor as the cheese ages. As it ages, the cheese becomes more creamy in texture and richer in flavor, providing a somewhat fruity tasting cheese. Banon cheese is usually served as an hors d’oeuvre or with fruit and wine.  Pair with Chenin Blanc or a Bordeaux.

 

Cheese Type: soft

Milk Type: goat

Rennet: animal

Age: 3 weeks

Origin: Bannon

Region: France

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Filed under Artisan Cheese, Banon Cheese, goat cheese

Misty Lovely an Amish Goat Cheese

misty lovely 1

Misty Lovely is an Amish raw milk goat cheese made in Leola, PA by Amos Miller at his Misty Creek Dairy.  The Amish make their cheese with recipes that have been handed down for generations. Misty Lovely is an exception.  Amos Miller has established himself as the “go-to” goat ricotta producer with this velvety invention.

The story goes like this… Once upon a time, in a little tiny village close to Lancaster Pennsylvania cheese maker Amos set out to make a feta goat cheese.  He had a nice farm, and the goats were fed the Pennsylvania grasses and clovers and were cared for like members of the family.  The goats even got to watch the children play at the village school which is next door at lunch time.  They were happy goats.  And yes happy goats make better milk!  Back to the story…. Amos set out to make a feta goat cheese. He took the raw goat milk added vegetable rennet, Celtic sea salt, lots of love and a few secret ingredients and worked his magic.  He watched over his new cheese for 60 days and at the right time he sampled his product and was surprise with the feta.  His cheese did not taste like a feta.  It started out like a feta in your mouth but finished like cheddar.  What to do now?  It’s not a feta nor was it a cheddar but it had a wonderful flavor more like a ricotta salata.  They took the cheese into town and asked Bill, at the Clock Tower Cheese Shoppe in Gap, PA to try it.  Bill sniffed it, pulled the curds apart and tasted it. He did a happy dance and declared it “lovely” and a cheese was named.

Raw milk cheeses are aged for 60 days which allows for a natural pasteurization and allows the cheese maker to retain a lot of the flavors of the raw milk.  More and more Amish families are turning to cheese making to preserve their way of living.  These cheeses are Artisan/Artisanal cheese that are produced primarily by hand, in small batches with lots of attention paid to the tradition of cheese making.  This cheese is also classified as “farmstead” by the American Cheese Society.  This means that it is made with milk from the farmer’s own herd or flock, on the farm where the animals are raised.  More and more people want to know their farmers and where their food is coming from.  Americans are learning that there is so much more to cheese than Kraft and cheddar.  It is reported that an average American will consume 10 pounds of cheddar a year.   One of the other things you will notice is that an Artisanal cheese’s flavor will change over the year.  In the spring it tends to be creamier and richer while in the winter months while the animals are eating hay it becomes more dense and piquant.

But once you taste really good cheese it’s hard to go back to the other cheeses that they grew up with.  This is one of those cheeses. It becomes addictive and the more you eat the more you want!

Try Stuffing dates with shredded Misty Lovely goat cheese, some cream cheeses and almonds.

dates stuffed with goat cheese

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Filed under Amish Cheese, Artisan Cheese, Cheese, Chef Lippe, Misty Lovely

Day 3 of Blue Cheese weekend – Amish Blue Cheese

Day 3 Amish Blue Cheese

The Amish have been making cheese the same way for hundreds of years. The animals are hand milked twice a day, grass feed, are sustainably raised. The cheeses are farmer-certified rBGH free.  Because of the wonderful care given the these animals the cheese is rich in calcium, contains no preservatives or chemical additives.

We will have Amish blue cheese made from cows, sheep and goats. This cheese is great served with wine and crackers, as a dessert with fresh fruit or in dips and pasta.  Our friends at Farris Farms have some WONDERFUL  grass fed steaks that the blue cheese will taste great on. Make sure to wear BLUE for your discount this weekend.

 We have paired it with the following: Stout, Sherry, Scotch, Sauternes,  Porter, Port, and late harvest Riesling.

blue cheese and fresh figsSerrano-Wrapped Figs

Ingredients

18 fresh figs, cut in half

1 cup Amish Blue cheese, softened

18 slices Serrano ham, cut 1/16” thick by 2” wide

1-1/2 cup arugula leaves

1/3 cup extra virgin olive oil

Juice of 1 lemon

1/2 cup slivered almonds, toasted

 

Directions

Preheat oven to 500° F. Scoop a small amount out of the center of each fig half and fill each half equally with the Amish Blue cheese. Put the halves back together and wrap each fig with Serrano. Bake until the Serrano begins to crisp, about 4 minutes. Remove from the oven and set aside.

Whisk together the lemon juice and olive oil and toss with the arugula. Place three warm figs on each plate. Place 1/4 cup of arugula in the center. Sprinkle with the almonds and serve

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Filed under Amish Cheese, Blue Cheese, Chef Lippe, goat milk, recipes

Serrano Ham Tapas – A FEAST for your eyes and your tummy!

By Chef Lippe

Serrano ham at market

Serrano ham is one of Spain’s favorite meats. When you walk into any tapas bar, restaurant or little shop you will see the hams hanging from the wall or a wall decorated with the ropes from the ham. I have included the recipe for one tapa and pictures from many others. It has also become a favorite at my Farmers Market stands.

I hope you have fun making and eating these!

Chef Lippe

stuffed-endives

Ham and Chicken Stuffed Endives

Left over chicken

Serrano Ham

Alioli

Salt and Pepper to taste

Directions

Slice the bottom inch away from the endive, remove the 6 largest leaves and arrange on plate.

Spoon 1 teaspoon of alioli along the bottom of each leaf.

Arrange shredded chicken on alioli and top with Serrano ham

Drizzle with good olive oil and server with tomatoes and fresh bread.

Enjoy the rest of my many uses of Serrano Ham or better yet come and visit our market stand and try a taste!

Asapargus-Wrapped

fig-with-chevre-and-serrano-hamGrissini-with-Serrano-hamfruit_serrano_ham_tapa_gastronomyham flowersladybug-appetizer-480x360Mini_Mozzarella_Prosciutto_Skewersmonkfish-serrano-ham-kebabsPicture 649serrano and mellonserrano olive and mellonWatermelon_Manchego_and_Serrano_Ham

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Filed under Artisan Cheese, asparagus, Avocados, Bread, Cheese, Cheese Crisps, Chef Lippe, figs, Food, Food blog, fruit, Manchego, Membrillo, olive oil, peach, pineapple, Quince Paste, recipes, Serrano Ham, spices, Tapa, tomatoes

King Crab meets Mr. Goat a match made in heaven!

By Chef Lippe

vare cheese

Crab meat is one of my favorites and so I combined it with a new favorite Vare (va-RAY) a goat cheese from Asturia Spain.  This is a small Artisan produce cheese where the family only makes about 200 cheese a week.  It is a pasteurized cheese steeped in brine for 12 to 24 hours, then aged for 40 to 50 days. This is when the cheese developes its natural rind richly coated with gray white molds. The cheese is smooth, firm and dense in texture and the flavor is herbaceous and sweet with just enough salt to make it balanced and mellow as a whole.

The combination of the cheese with the crab is quite addictive!

Ingredients:

4 to 8 whole crabs depending on size

1 Vare cheese, grated

4 tablespoons butter

4 tablespoons flour

2 cups cream

Salt and pepper to taste

Directions:

Cook crab until done and let cool. About 20 minutes

Harvest meat, saving body cavity.

Make a thin bechamel with butter, flour and hot milk by melting butter, stir in flour and then slowly add hot milk. Once the milk has been added stir in half of the grated cheese. Cook on low about 10 minutes stir entire time.  Add salt and pepper to taste.

crab stuffed

Once bechamel is done stir in crab meat and pour into cleaned crab bodies.

Cover each with remain cheese and broil until bubbly and brown.

Enjoy

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Filed under Artisan Cheese, Chef Lippe, Crab meat, Food, goat cheese, goat milk, recipes, Vare

Sweet Basil Cheesecake

We are finally settled into our new home and ready to start at the Farmers Market.  Here is what we will be serving this weekend at the Stuart Green Market.

Sweet Basil Cheesecake

Ingredients

Butter, for greasing the pan

1/2 cup (4 ounces) ricotta cheese, at room temperature

1/2 cup (4 ounces) cream cheese, at room temperature

1/3 cup (3 ounces) goat cheese, at room temperature

1 tablespoon sugar

1 large egg, at room temperature

1 large egg yolk, at room temperature

Pinch fine sea salt

1/2 packed cup chopped fresh basil

2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, for serving

Serving suggestion: assorted crackers

Special equipment: 4 1/2-inch diameter springform pan, about 2 1/2 inches tall

 

Directions

Place an oven rack in the center of the oven. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Butter the bottom and sides of a 4 1/2-inch diameter springform pan. Line the bottom of the pan with a piece of parchment paper. Wrap the outside of the pan with a piece of heavy-duty foil.

Place the ricotta cheese, cream cheese, and goat cheese in a food processor. Pulse

until mixed. Add the sugar, egg, egg yolk, and salt and blend until smooth. Add the basil and pulse until incorporated. Pour the cheese mixture into the prepared pan. Place the pan in an 8-inch by 8-inch square baking dish. Pour enough hot water in the baking dish to come halfway up the sides of the springform pan. Bake until the cheesecake is golden at the edges and the center of the cake moves slightly when the pan is gently shaken (the cheesecake will become firm when chilled), about 50 minutes. Turn off the oven and allow the cheesecake to cool in the oven for 1 hour. Remove the springform pan from the baking dish and remove the foil. Cover the pan with plastic wrap and refrigerate the cheesecake for at least 3 hours and up to 2 days. Remove the cheesecake from the springform pan. Allow the cheesecake to come to room temperature before serving, about 30 minutes.

Using a pastry brush, brush the top of the cheesecake with extra-virgin olive oil and serve with assorted crackers.

Or try this fall variation with pumpkin

Ingredients

½ cup ricotta cheese

½ cup cream cheese

1/3 cup crumbled feta or goat cheese

6 fresh basil leaves, chopped

2 tablespoons green onions, chopped

3 heaping tablespoons of canned pumpkin

1 large egg

1 large egg yolk

1 tablespoon sugar

Pinch of sea salt

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Filed under cheese cake, Chef Lippe, goat cheese, Onion